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Wisconsin Center 
for Film and Theater Research 

- 




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^ JSCONSTN" CENTER FOR 














































































saHTgaea' '.'J ' ; . i9i b 

^OrGl.J ork ; . ;r. 101 

"70I p^jCSTb fits 

ork jire V. jr . 13.; 

PRQiXTCT features alfa prev.yr. 107 

"tb />y>l % 

HIATOKT outstanding news 69 

headlines Y/id s daily '19, 

IiIT2Rt!ATI QlliL 

imports & exports 101 

exports 1913-1911 101 

DIATEIBUTIOU '/Sages state rights 105 
indie exchanges,product 11 

TliSAPRSA chain situation (article) So 

JAN31 ’32 









9 














William S. Hart 


oArtcraft Pictures 





To WID: 


DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 


f 
















Lois Weber 


LOIS WEBER 


















MAURICE TOURNEUR 
Director 

THE MAURICE TOURNEUR PRODUCTIONS 

“SPORTING LIFE”-“WOMAN”-“MY LADY’S GARTER” 









Marshall A. Neilan 

ANNOUNCES 

His First Independent Production 

“THE UNPARDONABLE SIN” 

\ 

By Major Rupert Hughes 

Starring 

MISS BLANCHE SWEET 

Supported by a Typical Neilan Cast 
Personally Directed by Mr. Neilan and » 

Produced by His Same Organization Which Made 

“Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm” “Out of a Clear Sky” 

“Amarilly of Clothesline Alley” “Three Men and a Girl” 

“M’Liss” and “Stella Maris” with Marguerite Clark, etc., during 

with Mary Pickford the past two years. 

For particulars address 

Harry I. Garson, Aeolian Hall, New York 

. .. " +■ . ' 

' .'•»*»’ • > 
y.’X: ik- **^4-..*^ .. - .. . • - * 




Allan Dwan 

M. P. D. A. 

‘Producer of 

Manhattan Madness 
Modern Musketeer 
Headin' South 
Mr. Fixit 

Bound in Morocco 
He Comes Up Smiling 

has severed his connection with 
Douglas Fairbanks and 

will produce independently 





















I 

jl 


Elsie Ferguson 

Art craft Star 


9 


I 











GEORGE D. BAKER 

DIRECTOR 

OF PRODUCTIONS 

Metro West Coast Studio 


Releases directed by Mr. Baker 


\ 

V- 




The Tarantula, with Edith Storey and 
Antonio Moreno 

The Pretender, with Emmy Wehlen 
The Shell Game, with Emmy Wehlen 
The White Raven, with Ethel Barrymore 
His Father’s Son, with Lionel Barrymore 
The Wager , with Emily Stevens 
Outwitted, with Emily Stevens 
The Demon, with Edith Storey 
1ft Toys of Fate, with Nazimova 
| Revelation, with Nazimova 









ALICE BRADY 



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Charles Giblyn 

I M. P D. A. 


DIRECTOR OF FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 


Permanent Address: 

112 Riverside Drive, New York 

Telephone,—Schuyler 2056 

or Friars Club, N. Y. C. 



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CHARLES RAY 

, . - - 


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t'i • 

Waa iMi? 







HOBART HENLEY 

M. P. D. A. 

Director of 

"LAUGHING BILL HYDE" 

The REX BEACH story 
in which WILL ROGERS starred 

(You Have Read the Reviews) 

NOW DOING 

ANOTHER REX BEACH STORY 

« 

for 

GOLDWYN 

Which Makes SEVENTH Consecutive Goldwyn Production 





Reginald Barker 

M. P. D. A. 

Just Completing 

Fourth Special Production 

Starring 

Geraldine Farrar 

for 

GOLDWYN 







S' 


«!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! !S ! !!!=!!!=^ § 


Kegards to Wid 
from 

Fannie Ward 


205 South New Hampshire St. 
Los Angeles, California 


= = 


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= = 


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BRYANT WASHBURN 

PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT 











EDWARD SLOMAN 



who directed 

“New York Luck” 

“In Bad” 

“Snap Judgment” 

“Sea Master” 

“Social Briars” 

“Money Isnt Everything” 
“The Frame-Up” 

“The Mantle of Charity” 
“Shackles of Truth” 

“My Fighting Gentleman” 
“High Play” 


AMERICAN FILM COMPANY 


SANTA BARBARA, CAL. 












MARGARITA FISHER 

American-Pathe Star 

Current Releases: 

“Molly Go Get ’Em,” “Jilted Janet,“Anne’s Finish,” “The Primitive 
Woman,” “The Square Deal,” “Impossible Susan,” “Money Isn’t 
Everything,” “The Mantle of Charity.” 



















THE 

STAR 

SUPREME 


/ 




1 



Personal Representative—Adolphe Osso, 1457 Broadway 
























WHERE ARE THEIR LEGS? 



the audience shouted 


They thought the picture was out of focus. 

They stamped their feet, they hissed. 

AND THEN CAME APPLAUSE!! 

It was in a little New York Motion Picture Theatre when spectators first saw the 
CLOSE-UP. 

They had always seen figures in the far-off. And here was a face as full and close as 
a mother’s over a cradle-bed. 

It startled, it shocked, it delighted. 

David Wark Griffith created the close-up, and later came other historic improvements 
from the ever-searching brain of that genius, the “cut-back” bringing suspense to the films, 
the “fade-away,” the “long-shot,” and on and on. 

Do you realize when you see a motion picture, no matter who the producer, you 
see a product done with the tools Mr. Griffith created? Others use them now, but 
he placed them in their hands and taught them how. 


He exacts no tribute or royalty for their use. 

He gives them freely to the world. 

“Mr. Griffith is the great legendary figure of the 
films, the great inventor and innovator of their 
youth, yet also the great consistent, progressing 
genius of today. As inventor of the ‘close-up’ and 
‘cut-back’ and half a dozen other technical devices, 
he might be content to occupy the position of a 
Masolina, discoverer of perspective and the art of 
painting. Yet each new production demonstrates 
that he is a Masaccio as well—an artist of full and 
splendid naturalistic powers. His is an art of pure 
emotion which can go beneath thought, beneath 
belief, beneath ideals, down to the brute fact of 
emotional psychology.”—(The New Republic.) 

# 

“With all respect to his rivals, Mr. Griffith has 
demonstrated his claim to the sole and only right 
to make a picture that will go on the big time and 
stay there at two dollars.”— (Washington, D. C., 

Heralffi ) DAVID WARK GRIFFITH 



“Griffith is the One Genius of the Films. He 
Stands Supreme and Alone.”— (Indianapolis Star.) 


Producer of “Hearts of the World,” now 
breaking all records in every principal city 
throughout the United States. 


















X 7HEN you see a Griffith production, you see the Griffith form of screen 
* * acting — acting that is so natural that it does not appear to be acting: 
art that conceals art .”—Louella Parsons. 

“LILLIAN GISH and ROBERT HARRON 
should be pointed to as shining examples of 
what screen lovers should be. There is nothing 
left for them to learn .”—New York Tribune. 


I N the twelve-reel Griffith productions. “The Birth of a 
Nation” and “Hearts of the World,” you saw the 
Griffith school of acting at $1.50 and $2.00. Mr. Griffith 
is now producing a series of six six-reel pictures for 
Artcraft, showing at popular prices, including 

“THE GREAT LOVE” 


“LILLIAN GISH and ROBERT HARRON, 
the most sublime pair of lovers since the great 
bard’s immortal story of Romeo and Juliet.” 
—Guy Price, Los Angeles Herald. 


Mr. Griffith has at all times endeavored to give you his 
best, and in these Artcraft productions he will give you 
the same unique and diversified characterization taken 
from the book of life, keeping entirely away from the 
old, exaggerated, stereotyped forms of acting. 


D.W. GRIFFITH FILMS 

A. L. Grey, General Manager 

720 Longacre Building, New York City 


All the Griffith productions are directed personally by Mr. Griffith and 
carry the Griffith trade-mark “DG” on the border line of the main title. 







Evans, L. A. (copyright) 



"7 


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Taylor Holmes 

Releasing Through 

Triangle Film Corporation 

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SEASON 

1918- 19 


announces with 
pleasure his early 
appearance in 


Strauss-Peyton (copyright) 


Over The Rhine 

A vivid and startling story of Hun frightfulness, based 
on the hitherto unexposed machinations of the infamous 

IRON CIRCLE OF BERLIN 

By Fred. J. Balshofer and Charles Taylor 

MR. ELTINGE 

will appear in the double roles of 

J A CK PERR Y 

A Patriotic Young American 
and 

ELSA VON BOHN 

In the Employ of the United States Secret Service 


The Eminent Screen Star 


Julian 

Eltinge 












C. GARDNER SULLIVAN 

Jluthor of 

“CIVILIZATION” 


u 


Peggy’’ 

“Hell’s Hinges” 

“The Pinch Hitter” 
“Shark Monroe” 


“Selfish Yates” 
“Naughty! Naughty!” 
“Love Me” 
and other successes 


Now writing 

ARTCRAFT AND PARAMOUNT FEATURES FOR 

Thomas H. Ince 
























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cPpi-^hing - 1917) 

STAB/ of GLOEX* 

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PEPPET 


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REV YOPY 



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America's 

PHOTOPLAY 

SUPREME 


LUCK IS BUT THE 
FLEETING SMILE 
OF FORTUNE 
THAT SOMETHING' 
IS THE HIGHWAY 
TO HER HOME 


Ok 

































KENNETH WEBB EDWARD EARLE 

DIRECTOR STAR 


S. L. Rothapfel says: 



“These O. Henry Stories are a credit 

to 

the 

industry, that goes for every one of 

them I 

have shown. I never saw pictures 

of 

this 

nature get so much applause.” 




These are the O. Henry Stories 


One Thousand Dollars 
Sisters of The Golden Circle 
Mammon And The Archer 
Tobin’s Palm 


Spring Time A’la Carte 
A Bird Of Bagdad 
Transients In Arcadia 
A Ramble in Aphasia 


< 






































































































































































































































































































































































































































K. Lincoln 


STARRED IN 


<< 


American Spirit” 


TO BE RELEASED SOON 


FEATURED IN 

“Lafayette, We Come!” 

and 

“Stars of Glory” 

Released by Affiliated Pictures 








I 



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J) irector &/* 

WitMn tlxe^Law: 

T’Other Deal Otanaer. 

The Courage (/'Silence. 0 <#' 

Wis'Ovn ^People, 

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/I he Dot Decides. 

iWoraanhaod. 


IN PREPARATION/ 

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PREPARATION. 


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Directing, 

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P/»RT SUPERvisiors.', 

QTioN RuntIng, 


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an^ more tlian (-2.0^ ivci\ty ot]\er /eature.s. 


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PAUL SCARDON PRODUCTIONS 

/ 

FOR VITAGRAPH 

AUGUST 1915 o OCTOBER 1918 INCLUSIVE 


The Island of Surprise 
Hero of Submarine D. 2 
Redemption of Dave Darcy 
The Man Hunt 


The Dawn of Freedom 
The Alibi 
Phantom Fortunes 
A Prince in a Pawnshop 


The Rose of the South 

The Enemy 

Her Right to Live 

Arsene Lupin 

Apartment 29 

The Hawk 

The Maelstrom 

The Stolen Treaty 

Transgression 

Soldiers of Chance 

The Love Doctor 

The Grell Mystery 

In the Balance 

The Other Man 

The Bachelor s Children 

The Golden Goal 

A Game With Fate 

Tangled Lives 

All Man 

The Green God 

The King of Diamonds 

Hoarded Assets 



PAUL SCARDON 

M. P. D. A. 

















Strauss-Peyton (copyright) 




























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INCE-PARAMOUNT PRODUCTIONS- 


THOS. H. INCE 


Presents Miss 


ENID BENNETT 

In a Series of Photo-Plays of Dis¬ 
tinction Under the Direction of 

FRED NIBLO 

The Thos. H. Ince Studios, Los Angeles 


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Independent 
Box- Office 


Consider 


THEODORE WHARTON 


“EXPLOITS' OF 
ELAINE” 


New Adventures of J. RUFUS 
WALLINGFORD 


“THE 


EAGLE’S 

EYE” 


At 

Your 

Service 


New York Office 

BROKAW BLDG. 

1457 Broadway 















Producers of 
Successes 


LEOPOLD WHARTON 


Ko • 

Make You 
Money 


“MYSTERIES 
OF MYRA” 


“PATRIA” 


Ithaca 
New York 


This List 


“GREAT 

WHITE 

TRAIL” 



















SHELDON LEWIS 













Lumiere Studios, N. Y. (copyright) 


VIRGINIA PEARSON 








GAIL KANE 






: 


BILLY BITZEPv 




























four special productions 

will be issued during the ensuing twelve months; four superlative story-pictures released at 
intervals which will insure the maximum expenditure of time and thought in their making; 
each an original conception by 

MONTE M. KATTERJOHN 

-—who will strive to give you special pictures of extraordinary theme and quality; "specials” 
worthy of the name because of their artistry, technical details, carefully selected casts, gen¬ 
eral production bigness, and coherent, entertaining story values. 

These will range from six to seven thousand feet in length. 

All production details will be under the individual management of the author—an ar¬ 
rangement which marks the inauguration of a new departure in the creation of quality mo¬ 
tion picture entertainment. 

We believe you will want to exhibit these greater-than-state-rights specials because of 
their tremendous box-office power—created towards pleasing all of your patrons. 

Address all communications to 





































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: ' ; : ' : : . ■ ■ . , ■ . . , , ( ; ; ■; ^ . ; ; : , ; , : 



ERNEST TRUEX 

Paramount star in John Emerson—Anita Loos productions who, according to \\ id, 
has made a most favorable impression with a likable pleasing style and oodles of 
personality. Mr. Truex brings with him a stage following, having created the star 
roles in 

“The Good Little Devil” “The Dummy,” 

‘ Overnight ” “Very Good Eddie ” 

“The Very Idea ” 

and others on the speaking stage 






HAKKY GARSON 


presents 


BLANCHE SWEET 


in 


The Unpardonable Sin 

By RUPERT HUGHES 

Personally directed by MARSHALL A. NEILAN 


Ready for Release Early in November 











Clara Kimball Young 

In Her Own Company 

PRESENTS 

The Road Through 
The Dark 


Directed by Edmund Mortimer 
























MOONSHINING JUDGE 
in TRICKING THE GOVERNMENT 


HIS OWN PEOPLE 




^■narar 


MOO 


VOM 


PPINCE of KHARIKAf? 
in " BLUE MOOH " 


, WANS PITTEP 

in THE QPEAT fieHIUw^ 


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Wt Jlitvm Vo xV 

Vact<x*<j Picture? 


• • • 


*Tfa@ S*tdv / 

Tom Mix 

Dii-ectot t 

t&tofo‘Q@ifnoidp 

Pietrihevr 0 f AVP-DA* 


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CWteni and Future 

PeU^re*^ 

>Yr. LO^vn.U* S'* A* 
"Pc*me and Fbi-tune ’ 
Two G-urv TYarv 0* 
"Cofniii^of tfwL aw ! 

t* *rV rrvfor ?vry Tit 1 <? 


4 


































ANNA LEHR 


Featured in 


“ Parentage” 

“The Bugle Call” 

“Laughing Bill Hyde” 

"The Yellow Ticket” 

“Civilization’s Child” 

“My Own United States” 

Now Playing “with JVilliam Farnum in Fox Production 







... iiiuiiuiuiiiiHiimiiiiimmiimiiiiHiiiuiiiiuinmuiiiiit 




Miss Mae Murray 

directed by 

c Lobert Leonard 

Has just completed 

cA Series of Special Productions 

Distributed by Universal 


oAnnouncement 

of the new distribution plans of 

£Mae tMurray Specials 

Directed by SMr. Leonard 

r will be made soon 





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EARL MONTGOMERY 


VITAGRAPH’S 

DAREDEVIL 

COMEDIANS 



JOSEPH ROCK 


Recent Releases 


STOWAWAYS AND 

STRATEGY 
PEANUTS AND POLITICS 
JUMBLES AND JOKERS 
TELEPHONES AND 

TROUBLE 

COURTS AND COPS 
JUMPING JACKS AND 

JAIL BIRDS 
TRAMPS AND TRAITORS 
SLEUTHS AND SLICKERS 
FLIRTS AND FAKIRS 
LAWS AND OUTLAWS 
LOVE AND LAVALLIERS 
SNEAKERS AND SNOOZERS 
LAME BRAINS AND 

LUNATICS 

BONDS AND BANNERS 


SKIPPERS AND 

SCHEMERS 

SHINES AND MONKEY 

SHINES 

DEAD=BEATS AND 

ATHLETES 

LAW MAKERS AND JAIL 

BREAKERS 

HIRED AND FIRED 

PEACHES AND PARADES 

LIFE SAVES AND LOVE 

_ CRAVES 

Now Making 2 Reel Feature 
Comedies 

“MINISTERS AND 

MATRIMONY” 
ROOFS AND RIOTS 
SUBS AND DUBS 



STORIES 

Written by 

MONTGOMERY 
AND ROCK 

Directed by 

ROY H. McCRAY 


Assistant Director 


IRVING ED. 
LUDDY 


Camera Man 

JOHN C. COOK 


Property Man 

GEO. MARION 



ROY H. McCRAY 


Scene from Jumbles and Jokers 















Alice Joyce 


Recent Productions 

The Fettered Woman 
A Woman Between Friends 
The Business of Life 
The Song of the Soul 
The Triumph of the Weak 
Find the Woman 
To the Highest Bidder 
Everybody's Girl 


Directed by 

Tom Terriss 











Lewis J. Cody 

Recent releases: The Bride’s Aw akening 

For Husbands Only 
Our Better Selves 













/<• 



MONA LISA 







John Emerson—Anita Loos 
Productions for Paramount 

“Come On In!” “Gosh Dam the Kaiser!” 

with Shirley Mason and Ernest Truex. with Shirley Mason and Ernest Truex. 

Released September 22nd, 1918. Released in November, 1918. 

“When the Boys Come Home.” 

A Paramount-Artcraft Special.—Released in January, 1919. 

with ERNEST TRUEX 

The Following Pictures Were Also Written and Produced By 

John Emerson and Anita Loos 

For DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS I 

“Wild and Wooly” “Reaching For the Moon” “Down to 

“In Again Out Again” “The Americano” “His Picture in the Papers” 



















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III 

II 


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Putting lour Money 

m in \ « " ' ——■■ »■—'"■■■■■■»■■ 

Wk ere It Belongs 


TjThe money paid by exhibitors for 
Screencraft Pictures goes on tbe screen 
—nowhere else. 

Screencraft s selling expense was disposed of 
before tke production of its features began. 

Exhibitors showing Screencraft produc¬ 
tions, therefore, are assured a full hundred 
cents worth of picture value for every 
dollar spent. 

Thus value will he reflected m attractions 
that are outstanding in story, cast and 
direction—pictures that are truly 

c iDramatic Features of Distinction. 




studios: new rochelle ny 

TEL.2277-2278 NEW ROCHELLE 


OFFICES 


LONGACRE BUILDING 


1476 BROADWAY NEW YORK 
TELEPHONES: 772-773 BRYANT 























































































Shipman Corrects False Impression. 


"On July I2th, at the request of Harry I. Garson, I 
met him at the Lasky Studios, Hollywood, where tbe arrang¬ 
ed with me to .communicate with The First national Exhibitors 
Circut, and to "feel out" the State Rights Buyers on his 
picture, "The Hushed Hour". 

We came to a definite agreement as to selling price, 
terms, etc. 

1 fulfilled my part of the contract, so advising Mr. 
Garson at his Detroit and Hew York Addresses. 

If the First national should, decline the picture my 
interest in its exploitation ceases, 


In view of certain misleading statements calculated 
to discredit my authority in this matter,I publish these 
facts so that the entire trade may know that I am in no 
way to be identified with any future exploitation of this 
picture• 




Harry S Havens, representative for "The EXHIBITOR'S 
TRADE REVIEW", in connection with the above, states 


"I was present at the meeting between Ernest Shipman 
and Harry Garson when Mr.Garson requested Mr.Shipman to 
"feel out" the open market on his pioture, "The Silent Hour" 
and Mr^Shipman's first move was to write the.First national 
about the proposition. 


Shipman was to receive Ten Percent from any sales and 
Gar*on left this matter to him upon that basis". 






A Story of Eve and ter modern sister featuring 

ENID MARKEY, EDWARD COXEN 

w and a cast of artists « ^ rr 
A picture de luxe that -will girdle tire earth, 
•with, tears and smiles and bring helpful 
w r? message to every liome •» ^ 

Ernest Slnpmau 

17 West 44 H SI New York 

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Ajicture willi a. purpose 






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FIRST AUTHENTIC STORY 


“The Lady of the Dugout” 

IN SIX REELS OF REALISM 


Disclaiming responsibility for all past pictures for obvious 
reasons, and ready to stand on the merits of “THE LADY OF THE 
DUGOUT," and all other stories filmed in this outlaw series, A1 
Jennings, the outlaw whose sentence for life was commuted by Presi¬ 
dent McKinley, who was pardoned by President Roosevelt, who 
received the nomination for Governor of Oklahoma, and who col¬ 
laborated with Will Irwin on the outlaw stories published in the 
“Saturday Evening Post,” declares over his own signature that every 
film story, henceforth presenting his brother Frank and himself, will 
be founded on facts. 

No matter how sensational the thrill, or how deep the emotion, 
the public will have the satisfaction of knowing it is looking at the 
genuine article and not moving picture fancy. 

“THE LADY OF THE DUGOUT,” and all other A1 Jen¬ 
nings outlaw stories, will be exploited in the open market by 



430 South Broadway 

LOS ANGELES 



17 West 44th Street 

NEW YORK 





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STATE RIGHTS BUYERS CAN BUY OUTRIGHT 
AT REASONABLE TERNS AND 'CLEAN UP!' 


pp iv 


17 WEST 44 T - H ST. 
NEW YORK CITY 



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Chains of Theatres an Important Factor 


Gradually, in the past few years, there has 
been a decided tendency towards the accumu¬ 
lation of several theatres by one individual or 
corporation, particularly the tieing up of all 
the best houses in one city. 

In some districts, these theatre chains almost 
dominate the activities of that particular sec¬ 
tion, being at times in a position to dictate what 
releases shall be shown in better theatres and 
at what prices they shall be booked. 

In analyzing this situation, and considering 
it in discussions with some of the more promi¬ 
nent sales managers here in New York, I have 
found a general recognition of the fact that 
there are not anything like ten thousand good 
theatres showing films in this country, and it is 
the general concensus of opinion that the actu¬ 
al figures, which oddly enough no one has ever 
listed perfectly, will come nearer to registering 
at about 6,000. 

For years, the saying that there were fifteen 
or twenty thousand film theatres has been re¬ 
cited glibly by the voluble soothsayers of the 
industry with the result that that saying has 
taken its place alongside of such classics as 
“The indusry is still in its infancy” and “The 
surface of the industry has not yet been scratch¬ 
ed.” 

It is very easy to understand how this pe¬ 
culiar idea as to the number of theatres in this 
country has held forth inasmuch as there has 
never, to my knowledge, and I have searched 
most of the offices in this town in recent years, 
been a truly accurate list secured of the the¬ 
atres operating in this country, which would in¬ 
telligently distinguish between an opry house 
in a hick town that might show a film once a 
year, and a live store show in a town of the 
same size which has progressed to the point of 
changing twice a week because of the ability 
of the manager in charge. 

These so-called lists of theatres that have ex¬ 
isted and used up postage in circularization for 
years in this industry, generally registered an 
appalling percentage of dead houses, repeats, 
and incorrect names and addresses. One of the 
principal reasons for the discrepancies which 
always existed in these lists was the fact that 
for many years it has been customary, particu¬ 
larly in the small towns, to change the name of 
a theatre whenever it changed management, 
and everyone who has been around the film 
business knows that theatres have changed 
management quite frequently 


In every office, these lists have been in 
charge of the mailing clerk and every time a 
mailing clerk was fired, the list suffered be¬ 
cause the new boy was entirely at sea. Most of 
the existing distribution organizations will tell 
you that they have a perfect list of theatres 
based upon reports made by their salesmen, 
and yet when it comes down to brass tacks 
you’ll find that except for a list of customers 
and immediate prospects, there is no such thing 
as an accurate existing list which will approach 
anything like the figures running above ten 
thousand. 

I do not for a moment dispute the fact that 
there are considerably more than ten thou¬ 
sand buildings in this country that bear the 
name of “theatre,” and I understand that taxes 
have been paid on something like fifteen or 
sixteen thousand theatres, but this of course 
includes buildings of every sort which could be 
so labelled. 

In analyzing the present situation, one out¬ 
standing fact, presents itself. There are only a 
very few thousand truly worth while theatres. 

The figures on the chain theatre situation 
run about as follows, these estimates having 
been prepared after a very careful consideration 
of data collected from several of our best dis¬ 
tributing companies and from several inter¬ 
views with well informed sales managers. 

There are 100 chains in this country which 
will average ten theatres to a chain. 

There are 150 chains in this country that will 
average five theatres to a chain. 

There are 500 combinations in this country 
that will average three houses each. 

There are 1000 instances where two houses 
are controlled by one man or one corporation. 

This means that 100 men control 1000 
houses; 250 men control 1750 houses; 750 men 
control 3250 houses and 1750 men control 5250 
houses. Figuring that on the outside there are 
more than 1000 houses separately and individu¬ 
ally owned that could qualify as first class the¬ 
atres, we have a total of 6250 theatres. 

It is undoubtedly true that there are several 
thousand theatres individually owned in addi¬ 
tion to this 6250 houses, but there is little ques- • 
tion in the minds of those well informed but 
that the 6000 mark amply covers everything 
that could be considered a first class film the¬ 
atre. 

When you think of such theatre chains as the 
Ascher Bros, in Chicago, the Stanley Interests 








in Philadelphia, the Saenger Interests in the 
South, the Jensen & Von Herberg theatres in 
the Northwest, the Hulsey chain in Texas, the 
Moss, Loew, Poli and Fox circuits, the 
Wells, Crandall, Craver and Lynch circuits in 
the South, the Rubin & Finkelstein circuit in 
Minneapolis, the Gordon theatres in Massachu¬ 
setts, the Clune Circuit in California, the Lub- 
liner and Trinz houses in Chicago, the Jones, 
Linick & Schaeffer in Chicago, the Kunsky 
houses in Detroit, the eight prominent theatres 
in Grand Rapids, the Butterfield Circuit in 
Michigan, the Keith & Proctor houses in New 
York and New Jersey, the Wilmer & Vincent 
houses in Pennsylvania, the several prominent 
circuits in Cincinnati, the Roland & Clark inter¬ 
ests in Pittsburgh, etc, etc., it is easy to under¬ 
stand how the chains of theatres are a very very 
important factor in the booking of films in 
every district in this country today. 

I have not attempted to give here any list or 
special figures because changes are so rapid in 
this business and I have only mentioned the 
names of chains that came to my mind in pass¬ 
ing. 

I believe that it is an important thing for 
everyone connected with the business to cease 
this silly talk of fifteen and twenty thousand 
theatres, because it is very misleading and fre¬ 
quently has rather disastrous results because 
the figures are accepted as reliable by unin¬ 
formed persons who want to tamper with the 
film business either with a view of reforming 
it or with a view of investing money therein. 

In discussing the number of really first class 
theatres, I found that one sales manager who 
should be rather well informed, felt that the 
number would not exceed 2500. Another esti¬ 
mated that it would be nearer 4000, and since 
he is connected with one of our largest corpora¬ 
tions, it is possible that he, through having 
more goods to sell, has broadened his scope of 
vision, and included theatres which would not 
normally be considered really first class houses. 

I believe a conservative estimate would place 
the number of really first class houses at about 
2000, with a second 2000 rating as second class 
and a third 2000 as third class, with the bal¬ 
ance, whatever the number may be, distinctly 
fourth class or worse. 

The First National Exhibitors Circuit in¬ 
forms me that they have 4500 Chaplin custom¬ 
ers. This would naturally carry down to the 
very smallest houses, and since Chaplin has 
played in competing houses, probably more 
than any other star, it is a splendid indication 


that a conservative figure should be used in es¬ 
timating a total for the country. 

With the growing tendency on the part of 
exhibitor individuals and exhibitor corpora¬ 
tions to attempt to control all of the worth 
while theatres in a given community, the dis¬ 
tributor of films is facing a rather serious prob¬ 
lem. This is well known to established con¬ 
cerns, and I am only emphasizing the point at 
this time for the information of newcomers who 
may approach this marvelous industry with a 
nonchalant notion that it is “easy game.” 

When the fact is taken into consideration 
that the success or failure of almost any pro¬ 
duction in any territory is settled in the first 
thirty or sixty days’ run of the film in that ter¬ 
ritory, the importance of the chain theatres be¬ 
comes even more impressive. There are many 
districts today in which good films have been 
unable to make a dent because they did not get 
started under the proper auspices. 

Figuring the use of eighty release prints, and 
I believe that number is about the maximum, 
and allowing for sixty days’ booking, in which 
there will be some lost time and several extra 
day runs, we can estimate that each print in the 
sixty days’ time will be shown in approximate¬ 
ly twenty-five theatres. If the eighty prints 
work in twenty-five theatres in the first sixty 
days, it would register in 2000 theatres, which 
I believe is a figure that is seldom reached by 
any offering. 

When you consider the fact that these book¬ 
ings, and the success or failure of the produc¬ 
tion in those theatres influences to a marked 
degree the amount of bookings to be received 
in the other available theatres, it is easy to un¬ 
derstand how important the first 1500 or 2000 
theatres are in the process of marketing feature 
films. 

I want to commend particularly to the new¬ 
comer and also to the director or star who is 
considering independent production, a careful 
consideration of the above figures on film 
distribution which is not as simple as it might 
seem, and yet I want to close with the remark 
that there was never such a wonderful oppor¬ 
tunity as there is now and will be in the com¬ 
ing year for success in the fullest measure 
whenever a really worth while special feature 
is presented for distribution. 






MISS CLARA WILLIAMS 

Carmen in 

Carmen of the Klondike” 

Star of Many Successes of First Triangle Co. 
No^w dieturning to the Sereen 

















Most Important Event of the Year 

Answering the question, “What do you consider the most significant happening in the motion pic¬ 
ture industry between September, 1917, and 1918^”, producers, distributors and exhibitors express 
their opinions in the following pages. 


Griffith’s Thought 

What is more important in the records of the indus¬ 
try during the past year than the adoption of motion 
pictures by the War Office as the major medium for 
propaganda, educational and publicity work? 

I). W. Griffith. 

Value As Educational Medium 

In my opinion, the most important development of 
the motion picture in the past year has been exemplified 
in its demonstration of definite value as an educational 
medium. Long before this year the world accepted the 
motion picture as the foremost agency of entertainment 
and amusement extant; but it remained for the activities 
of the screen this past year to register indisputably the 
fact that as an avenue of propaganda, as a channel of 
conveying thought and opinion to the world at large, 
it can not only be unsurpassed but unequalled by any 
other form of communication. 

Thus during the last twleve months the motion 
picture has added to itself a great function, and has 
endowed its destiny with a tremendous purpose—that 
of bringing not only a smile and thrill, not only physical 
and mental emotions—but also enlightenment and 
spiritual uplift to its millions of followers. Beyond this 
important manifestation of its new power which the 
motion picture has displayed during the past year, it 
has further proven that it can bring this mental effect 
to bear not only upon the uneducated, but also upon the 
educated and thinking people. 

]u a greater measure than ever before in its entire 
history, the cultivated and cultured people of the country 
have found in the motion picture a genuine appeal to 
their minds and hearts. The motion picture is therefore 
no longer the theatre of the masses, but is today the 
amusement of the masses and classes. College pro¬ 
fessors, authors, lecturers, men of all the professional 
and scholastic fields have found in the photoplay the¬ 
atres as deep and vital a lore to base principles and 
build dreams upon as they have found in the product 
of the pulpit, the platform and the library. The motion 
picture has found its place in the intellectual sun, and 
its power to kindle the spirits- and touch the imagina¬ 
tions of legions of people is now adorned with a new 
psychic ability to reach the soul as well as the heart of 
mankind. 

ADOLPH ZTTKOR, 

President, Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

Theatre Owner Becoming Producer 

I consider the decision of motion picture theatre 
owners to enter the distribution field, lighting the way 
to a stable market for independent producers and assist¬ 
ing present distributing organizations in arriving at a 
sane, conservative system to do away with the gigantic 
waste in present methods, to be the most important 
happening of the year in the industry. 

C. C. PETTI JOHN, 

General Counsel, 
Affiliated Distributors Corp. 


Nothing New or Sensational 

Personally I have not noted anything new or sensa¬ 
tional, as regards either the execution or the presenta¬ 
tion of motion pictures, that signalizes the past year 
in the history of the screen. No effort of either the pro¬ 
ducers or the exhibitors, however praisworthy, seems to 
me ground for unusual enthusiasm. 

Apparently this lack of progress is due chiefly to the 
war. However, if I may be permitted to say so, no eco¬ 
nomic crises in the affairs of a commercial enterprise 
should be permitted to interfere in a matter of ai’t. 

The money spent on the production of mediocre film 
might just as well have been employed in the execution 
of pictures which would have left with us only the most 
interesting recollections. When we recall the films that 
have captivated our imaginations, whether because of 
their subjects, their settings, or their interpretation, we 
must agree, unfortunately, that recent motion photog¬ 
raphy has shown us nothing new or untried. For more 
than a year, we are forced to confess, this new art has 
made no actual progress. 

Whose fault is it? I have no hesitation in replying, 
the producers. It has been the fault of the producer, 
who has sacrificed without scruple and without shame 
the cinematographic art to what many persons have too 
often confused with the motion picture industry, the 
chief aim of which is not primarily to produce a first- 
class film, but to achieve a good stroke of business. 

Among the productions of recent months, the one 
which stands out above all the rest is “Hearts of the 
World” the masterpiece of the great Griffith, to whom 
I am happy to pay this public homage. Without ques¬ 
tion it is the most important, the most intensely tragic 
photoplay which the American cinematograph has pro¬ 
duced since the outbreak of the war. 

LEONCE PERRET 


Getting Away From Old System 

Unquestionably, the biggest event was the official 
declaration that the motion picture business is essential 
to the nation in wartime. Here is official recognition 
of our art as a vital, integral part of life—or our govern¬ 
ment itself. The screen has, I believe, given more con¬ 
sistent, well considered aid to the carrying on of the 
war than any other single factor. I am proud of the 
business of which I am a part and proud of its work 
in this war. In a hundred ways—from aiding Liberty 
Loan drives to sustaining the morale of the nation—the 
movie is doing its mighty “bit.” The films carrying on. 

The biggest event of production? There has really 
been no one big event of distribution. Yes. The big 
event here is the breaking away of stars and directors 
from producing organizations with their cut and dried 
system of production and their entrance into the field 
of independent photoplay making. This departure from 
the old system means individuality and should mean 
advancement to the photoplay. Naturally, but a portion 
of these independent producers will stand the test. But 
out of this melting pot something good is bound to come. 

MAURICE TOURNEUR. 




THE EMERALD MOTION PICTURE STUDIO 



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I 


Appreciation of Open Booking Plan 

In my opinion, the most important happening in the 
moving picture industry during the past year—outside 
of the affairs of war—is the rapid awakening of the 
mass of exhibitors to the fact that a wide open booking 
plan is the only safe one for them to adopt. 

The attempt of some of the producing companies to 
tie up the exhibitors on a non-cancellable contract looked 
like a vicious proposition at first, but I believe it is 
proving a blessing in disguise because it has caused 
the exhibitor to study the benefits of open booking as 
never before. 

You have helped in this awakening. Mr. Laemmle 
has helped to expose the dangers. I h&ve also noticed 
a gradual movement among the majority of producers 
to arouse the exhibitors to the danger of an air-tight 
contract. 

Many attempts have been made to effect a monopoly 
in this business, but the most recent attempt through 
the medium of the non-cancellable contract is by far 
the most shrewdly managed of them all. Years ago 
when a then large picture concern tried to secure a 
throttle hold on the exhibitors by means of patents, the 
campaign was so badly bungled by mistreatment of ex¬ 
hibitors that it fell of its own weight. 

In the current campaign to control the exhibitors, 
there is no mistreatment of exhibitors at present; and 
therein lies the shrewdness or foxiness of the movement. 
What mistreatment might take place after a monopoly 
became a fact is guesswork, but the real danger of the 
present campaign lies or rather did lie in the fact that 
it was presented in such an alluring way to exhibitors. , 

The fact that a few, including yourself and Mr. 
Laemmle, undertook the unpleasant task of ripping the 
thing wide open and showing it in all its rottenness to 
exhibitors is a mighty fortunate thing for the showmen 
who hope to control their own theatres and be their 
own bosses. 

As a result of this campaign of exposure, I understand 
that in cases where the exhibitors oppose the signing 
of a non-cancellable contract, they are given a special 
contract which is so rubber-stamped that it contains 
the usual cancellation clause. 

According to my way of thinking, this daring attempt 
to give the exhibitor a sweet choking has been (and 
may still be) the most significant event in the business. 
Next in importance is the fact that the regular program 
feature has been forced to give way to the big special 
picture because itlie latter offers the highest class on the 
market. 

R. H. COCHRANE, 

Vice Pres., Universal Film Mfg. Co. 


Exhibitor Cooperative Association 

In my opinion, the most important happening in the 
motion picture industry during the past year, is the 
development of exhibitor co-operative associations 
throughout the United States. 

It is my belief that we are listening to the murmur- 
ings only of co-operative bookings at this time and in 
the not too distant future a real big organization will be 
developed along practical business lines, which will be 
productive of very profitable results to the exhibitors 
interested. 

The intensive development of the star series produc¬ 
tions and the tremendous individual pictures which have 
appeared during the year, are also worthy of passing 
notice. 

SYDNEY. S. COHEN. 


Warring Factions Disappear 

I consider the action of the Motion Picture Conven¬ 
tion in Chicago of inestimable importance, in the fact 
that the two warring factions of the exhibitors became 
affiliated and their disappearance as a separate entirety, 
they having agreed to become a branch of the National 
Association of the Motion Picture Industry. 

This action makes it possible to secure as members 
at least 90 per cent, of the motion picture exhibitors of 
America. As practically all of the influential producers 
and distributors are members of the Association, the 
industry will now be in shape to build up one of the most 
powerful business organizations in the world, and it 
goes without saying, this power will be used for good. 

The President of the United States, The Committee 
on Public Information, and other Governmental depart¬ 
ments all look upon the motion picture as a wonderful 
medium of education, and the Government is taking 
advantage of this medium by spreading their publicity 
matter throughout the world in the form of motion pic¬ 
tures, both of an educational and entertainment char¬ 
acter. 

WILLIAM WRIGHT, 

Sec’y and Treas., Kalem Co. 


Exhibitor Distributing Organizations 

In my opinion, the forming of the exhibitors distri¬ 
buting organizations, such as the First National, Affili¬ 
ated and the United, will prove to be the greatest 
development, since they will be able to supply the 
exhibitors with good films, at the prices that he can 
afford to pay. 

I hardly believe that my opinion is shared by the 
greater number of producing organizations, but never¬ 
theless, this is my opinion. 

THEO. W. WHARTON. 


Becoming an Organized Business 

The most important thing that has happened in the 
motion picture industry this year, has been the recogni¬ 
tion given it by the Government as to its necessary 
importance in the spreading of propaganda and assist¬ 
ance in war work. 

« 

As to the development of the industry itself, it is 
quite apparent that we are rapidly becoming an or¬ 
ganized business. The day of “horse swapping” busi¬ 
ness transactions is practically over and during no year 
have more noticeable steps forward been made in this 
direction than during the past one. 

Along these lines the industry has become more 
stabilized as regards the relations between exhibitor 
and distributor. For instance, today the exhibitor is able 
to plan ahead with more certainty than ever before. He 
can sign for various products and feel quite sure that 
they will be delivered to him as per schedule. He can 
lay out his campaigns of exploitation just like a retailer 
in any other business can do. In short the industry is 
rapidly becoming more of a business than during any 
twelve months since its inception. I do not mean to 
say that the industry has become a perfect business in¬ 
stitution, but surely it is rapidly approaching that point. 

HAROLD EDEL, 

Managing Director, Strand Theatre. N. Y. C. 





Wi d says: 

“The Pacific Coast is the logical place 
to make release prints" 

The Sanborn Laboratories, Inc. 

is the logical organization on the Coast to do your release print work 

We are turning out release prints for 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 
“SMILING BILL” PARSONS COMEDIES 
AUTHORS PHOTOPLAY CO. 

together with many others, as well as making sample prints for 

NINETY PER CENT 

of the big productions made on the Coast 
There must be a reason for this. Think it over. 

THE SANBORN LABORATORIES 

INCORPORATED 

CULVER CITY LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

We control exclusive rights for the Handschleigh Color Process 



-o 


Awakening of The Exhibitor 

I sincerely believe that the most important happening 
or development in the industry during the past year is 
the awakening of the exhibitor to a sense of his real 
position in the industry. 

This awakening has taken the form of a realization 
that he, the exhibitor, is in reality the foundation of 
the motion picture structure, in view of the fact that his 
investment is the only permanent one in the business 
and that upon his efforts depend the development and 
expansion of the market for motion picture product. 

With this realization the exhibitor has also discovered 
that the control of the industry cannot be in the hands 
of any one faction if the industry is to continue and to 
grow, unless such faction has complete ownership of 
all branches and consequent responsibility. 

He has discovered that it is absolutely illogical for 
this control to be as it is now-in the hands of producer 
interests, which only seek to perpetuate themselves by 
the control of transient elements, such as books, plays, 
directors and stars, whose value is not fixed, but con¬ 
tinually fluctuating. 

And, exhibitors as a whole, I believe, appreciate that 
it is unreasonable to suppose that producer interests 
can continue to dominate when their sole idea is to 
make all of the pictures required for the trade, rather 
than to adopt a system of encouraging production of 
quality on a competitive basis which, by the process of 
elimination wall do away with the unfit or poor material 
and encourage new product from sources not controlled 
by at present dominant producer groups. 

Although the exhibitor is awakening, history, recent 
and old, shows that co-operative movements, coming 
about spontaneously among the exhibitors themselves 
do not work out successfully and the exhibitor is in 
great danger of placing himself once again under pro¬ 
ducer control in a new form by supporting co-operative 
plans, the results of which are painted so glitteringly 
as to be not reasonably possible. \ 

It has been stated that I personally object to producer 
control, just because it is producer control, and I be¬ 
lieve this to be as good an opportunity as any to state 
that this supposition is entirely erroneous. I do not 
object to producer, or any other control, so much as to 
groups of producers controlling the business when their 
sole desire is for the perpetuation of their own schemes 
“and organizations, rather than to encourage and promote 
progress and the advance of quality in all branches of 
the industry. 

Any control which definitely encourages new ideas, 
new blood and progressive steps, in other words which 
is vital and which will definitely advance all of us as 
a collective unit, I firmly believe in and will support 
regardless of its origin. 

WM. W. HODKINSON, 
President W. W. Hodkinson Corp. 


Increase in Entertaining Pictures 

To my mind the most important happening of the 
year in the motion picture industry is that the producers 
have at last awakened to the fact that the public wants 
to be amused rather than horrified and the rapid strides 
the producers have made in the last few months toward 
the making of more light, wholesome and clean pro¬ 
ductions. 

Here’s hoping that they may continue. 

With cordial regards and best wishes, I beg to remain, 

H. M. CRANDALL. 

Crandall’s Thentres, Washington, D. C. 


Stories of a Higher Type 

To my mind the most significant developments in the 
motion picture industry in recent months have been: 

An apparent development of the public’s taste for 
the better type of pictures, the increase in the better 
type of film dramas, a higher type of stories, the disap¬ 
pearance of the audience that formerly awaited the 
salacious or “strong” dramas. I feel that the companies 
that have pinned their faith on cleanliness are coming 
more fully into their own. 

As to the types of stories that seem to have gained 
the greatest popularity with exhibitors and the public, 
I have seen the steadily increasing popularity during 
the past year of the comedy drama that is packed with 
action and “situation,” the popularity of the romantic 
melodrama that is skilfully presented and screened with 
good taste in better environments than have hitherto 
been associated with the thought of melodrama. 

In distribution the noteworthy tendencies have been 
increased economies, more sane business management 
and the realization that war-time conditions made it 
imperative for the elimination of wasteful practices of 
the past. 

SAMUEL GOLDFISH. 

President Goldwyn Pictures Corp. 


Doubling of Rental Prices 

I suppose that you think my idea of the most im¬ 
portant thing is the distribution of big productions at 
a fixed rental price of $10, $20 and $30 per day, but 
old top, I am going to fool you. 

While I do not think that this is the most important 
happening this year, I do think that it is one of the 
important things for the exhibitor to look forward to 
in the future. Aside from this I do not know of any¬ 
thing else important except that from the exhibitor’s 
standpoint (and I happen to be one), I find, upon sign¬ 
ing contracts for my theatre, they are asking nearly 
double the rental price this year for the same stars 
that I played last year, and I cannot figure out how the 
exhibitor is going to make any money, when paying it 
all out for pictures. 

I sincerely hope that someone else will have nerve 
enough to come out with a fixed price for pictures and 
thus get the picture industry down to a sound basis 
and out of the sky-rocket class. Unless this happens, 
I do not believe the producing or distributing of pictures 
will ever be a safe investment for anyone. 

Just a minute! I made a little mistake. On second 
thought, and looking at your letter head. I believe Wid’s 
Daily is one of the most important happenings of the 
year. 

With best wishes to yourself, and hopes for big suc¬ 
cess for your publication, 

FRANK G. HALL, 


All Interests Under One Head 

In my opinion the most important event that is 
taking place in the motion picture industry is the 
amalgamation of all the interests under one head during 
this last Chicago Convention. To me this is tremend¬ 
ous in its scope and offers unlimited possibilities. 

S. L. ROTHAPFEL, 
Managing Director, 
Rialto and Rivoli, N. Y. City. 






Dolores Cassinelli 

Starred in 

Leonce Perret ’ Productions 

Lafayette, We Come!” 
Stars of Glory ” 

and other productions 
to be announced 

Adolphe Osso 

Representative 

1457 Broadway New York 




















Vital Factor in Propaganda 

Replying to your letter of the 28th. ult. in which you 
asked for my opinion regarding the most note-worthy 
and significant thing accomplished by the motion pic¬ 
ture industry during the past year—would say, without 
hesitation, that I consider the development of the motion 
picture, during the last twelve months, into a con¬ 
spicuously vital factor for the dissemination of govern¬ 
mental propaganda, to be the most important. Had 
pictures accomplished nothing throughout their short 
history but to bring the great war home to the people 
of the United States, they would have vindicated, etern¬ 
ally, their right to live! Let those who doubt, go to 
any theatre any night, and listen to the spontaneous 
applause which greets a scene showing the action of 
our “Boys”—or French or English or Italian “Boys” 
—as they go “over the top”! 

Both through original story, such as our patriotic war 
dramas, and through picturization of actual war scenes, 
such as our Weeklies, the motion picture, today, is posi¬ 
tively developing patriots—dragging the spectator from 
the smug complacency of his good—and very safe— 
after-dinner-cigar, willy nilly, across the seas to the 
panting, sweating, struggling world-drama going on 
“over there.” Our heretofore lethargic spectator now 
begins to see and, because he sees, to understand; and 
all this, because he, himself, has suddenly become an 
integral part of the titanic struggle, rapidly shifting 
his own perspective as the swift scenes unroll, until 
he finds himself, at last, fighting breathlessly, with the 
French at Soissons—battling with Haig at Ypres 
—starving with the Belgians at Antwerp—and sweating 
with the Americans at the Marne—his breath quickens 
and his heart pounds as he, himself, falls into step with 
the Drums of the World! 

Is any other factor in our social or civic life doing 
this? Can any other factor do it? No! Because pic¬ 
tures are the only agents we know which teach their 
lesson solely through the eye—the only medium which 
can tell a story without a single spoken, written or 
printed word. Seeing is, indeed, believing! 

And so. Pride of Patriotism—grim Determination to 
Win the War—Calm Decision to support every measure 
of our government unreservedly to that end. is finally— 
through nightly and daily iteration—instilled, with tell¬ 
ing force, into the breast of the spectator— a spectator 
taken from every class of American! 

Let us not lose sight of the following fact in our 
earnest endeavor to turn out more and more artistic 
creations—namely: That today, the motion picture is 
teaching good citizenship—smashing, irrevocably, the 
Kipling adage that “East is East, and West is West— 
and never the twain shall meet”! For, through the 
motion picture, the West, our great agricultural West, 
and the East, our great industrial East, are made not 
only to meet, but to shake hands in a new and ever¬ 
lasting understanding. The eastern states, busy and 
competent, with their great steel industries—flaming¬ 
mouthed as some mighty prehistoric dragon—are sud¬ 
denly made to understand, through pictures, that the 
West, with its countless acres of golden grain, is also 
playing a stupendous part in War Efficiency—by feed¬ 
ing the entire world! And the West, entirely self 
absorbed in this mighty undertaking, is also, made to 
comprehend—again through pictures—that all the 
smashing, noisy clamor in the dingy steel factories of 
the East is not just so much distasteful noise and grime, 
but the battle-song of a million rivets, welding together 
the mighty “Beams” and “Hulls”—without which, their 
own wide fields of wheat could never be shipped to feed 
a starving world! The Need of the Wheat—the Need 


of the Steel! Twin Necessity, which the East and the 
West are meeting jointly—how they are meeting this 
need, is shown to the masses of our great American 
Public through pictures every day throughout the year. 
Are we not justified in calling this efficient citizenship? 
And never let us forget that this mighty lesson in pa¬ 
triotism is brought home to more people—more often 
and at a cheaper price—than through any other medium 
in the world! 

All other development exhibited by our very active 
industry during the past year—however far reaching— 
to me, becomes subordinate. 

CECIL B. de MILLE 

Director General, 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 


Hope for the Future 

In my opinion, the most important development in 
the film industry during the past year, has been, of 
course, its recognition by the Government as an essen¬ 
tial industry, thereby acknowledging it as the most im¬ 
portant medium known for propaganda. 

While dwelling upon the strength of this great in¬ 
dustry of ours, I am prompted to express what I hope 
will be the most important development in the coming 
year, viz., the proper and organized use of this strength 
by all exhibitors. Simultaneously with the announce¬ 
ment of the Government’s‘attitude came a manifestation 
ou the part of one distributor, proving positively that 
the exhibitor is dormant and unaware of his great power. 
Deposits were revived, the exhibitor meekly acquiesced. 
The retailer was made to finance the manufacturer. A 
condition unfair! 

To come back to the hope I expressed above, until 
exhibitors realize what influence their concerted voices 
can exert in the councils of the industry, they will one 
and all be individually a prey to the big fellow. 

I hope that in the coming year we will take this 
Governmental opinion seriously, and at last get together, 
not merely for our mutual benefit, but, which is more 
urgent, for our mutual protection. If we could persuade 
the Government, we can certainly persuade the exchange. 

M. KASHIN, 

Manager Broadway Theatre, 

New York 


Independent Producing Units 

To my mind, the formation of independent producing 
units headed by stars, constitutes the matter of most 
importance to the business as a whole. 

In it I can see the beginning of a period when the 
exhibitor jvill be able to book a picture for its box office 
and entertainment value. When the star of a pleasing 
production will reap the benefits also, both financially 
and as an artist. When the bad picture will lie on the 
exchange shelf and the good picture be working with 
extra prints. When the near star will not be carried 
on a program at the same prices as a really popular 
actor’s productions. When the star, the director and 
the business office will hesitate before doing a story 
that doesn’t stand a chance of getting across with 
audiences. 

If this time ever comes, the showmen of the picture 
houses will then be able to be something besides theat¬ 
rical bell hops. 

J. S. DICKERSON, 
Manager Watkins Opera House. 

Watkins, N. Y. 








FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN BEVERLY BAYNE 


The Screen’s Idols and Idealists 


The Year’s Record for Achievement 


Their Compact 
Adopted Son 
Voice of Conscience 
Under Suspicion 
Pair of Cupids 


Red, White and Blue Blood 
Cyclone Higgins D. D. 

With Neatness and Despatch 
The Brass Check 
Social Quicksands 


Coming Releases, “The Legacy" and “The Gauntlet ” 












-n 


Government’s Recognition of Screen 

In my judgment, the most important development in 
the motion picture industry for the past year, is the 
recognition by all the important governments of the 
world and their various agencies, that the motion picture 
is the greatest means of thought transmission so far 
known to man, combined with the thorough realization, 
on the part of the industry, that so potent a vehicle of 
education and influence carries with is a corresponding 
responsibility. 

As applied to our country, the motion picture has be¬ 
come the school of patriotism for the American people, 
as well as the principal agency of the Government in 
the war education of its citizens and their resulting 
duties. 

WALTER W. IRWIN, 

Vice Pres, and General Manager, 

Vitagraph Co. 


Humanizing Effect of the War 

In my opinion the greatest happening in the motion 
picture industry during the year is the sobering and 
humanizing effect of the war. 

There has been too much quackery and unreality in 
the motion picture. Too many producers had an idea 
that they could get by with trickery and spectacular 
stuff that had neither truth nor heart appeal. The heroic 
effort and sacrifice we have been forced to undergo in 
this desperate struggle as a nation has compelled us to 
realize that the greatest thing in the world is human 
nature, after all. We are getting down to the funda¬ 
mentals. 

In timefe of great stress and anxiety we are naturally 
serious-minded, but we also require the saving grace 
of humor to keep us out of the dumps. The motion 
picture reflects life, and whatever affects life affects 
the motion picture. The kind of pictures in demand 
now are those that tell us the truth about life and at the 
same time spread a wholesome and cheery influence that 
gives us heart to meet all tests of courage and sacrifice. 

War is responsible for a great many things that are 
evil. But its influence on the motion picture is of the 
most salutary sort. 

FRANK A. KEENEY, 

Pres. Frank A. Keeney Corp. 


Recognizing Good Quality 

Aside from the fact that our Government has classed 
the motion picture as an essential industry, I believe 
the next important tendency is the recognition of good 
stories and good directors, both of which are necessary 
in the making of successful photoplays. 

With best wishes for your continued success, I am, 

E. O. WEINBERG, 
Elmwood Theatre Co., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 


More Liberal Booking Policy 

I think the most important item of the past year 
has been the more liberal policy shown in regards to 
open booking, by producer, distributor and exhibitor. 

Second, the chance to try in a practical way, the co¬ 
operative plan by exhibitors. 

Third, that WID’S DAILY is not afraid to defend 
the exhibitor where they feel an injustice is being done, 
whether on the production of pictures or their merits, 
contracts, etc., etc. 

THOMAS FURNISS, 
Manager Bushwick Amusement Co. 

Duluth, Minn. 


Success of Bigger Pictures 

The most satisfactory thing in the motion picture 
business of the past year, in my opinion, is the suc¬ 
cessful production of bigger pictures, marking the tend¬ 
ency towards that much desired goal—THE OPEN 
MARKET—resulting in the elevation of the business 
by elimination of cheap pictures. 

J. D. WILLIAMS, 

Manager First Nat’l Exhibitors’ Circuit 


Centralization and Co=operation 

Amid the marked progress in the motion picture in¬ 
dustry, progress eloquently attested by the magnificent 
service the industry has rendered, and is still rendering 
to the nation, whether in speeding up Liberty Loans or 
spreading the message of the Government through the 
land—there stands out, in my opinion, that vital ac¬ 
complishment the crystalization into definite working 
form, of what has hitherto been merely a recognized 
but intangible trend towards economic centralization, 
and tendency towards unity of effort which should em¬ 
brace production, distribution and exhibition of motion 
picture product. 

Centralization and co-operation are no longer mere 
tendencies and trends, but recognized and essential 
foi'ces already in operation. 

Just as on the fields of Europe the once haphazard, 
unco-ordinated, though well meant Allied efforts to 
victory produced wasteful and partially disappointing 
results, and just as Allied success is now here because 
of co-operative action unified by centralization, so the 
instrument of progressive and enduring success for the 
exhibitor army in the motion picture field, namely or¬ 
ganized cost-reducing co-operation and waste-saving 
Centralization, is. I am confident, to-day not merely at 
hand, but already arrived. 

J. A. BERST. 

Pres. United Picture Theatres, Inc. 


Propaganda Work of Stars 

I may say emphatically that I believe the co-opera¬ 
tion between the stars of the screen and the producers, 
as well as others engaged in the various details of pic¬ 
ture making, in the great drive for the Fourth Liberty 
Loan, outshines anything else that has happened in 
the past twelve months. 

This co-operation and the resultant output has 
wonderfully demonstrated the power of the screen as 
a medium for expression of invaluable propaganda, and 
its possibilities for the awakening of the greater spirit 
of patriotic service. 

I may with justice mention the really splendid propa¬ 
ganda pictures for this campaign which were made by 
such stars as Mary Pickford. Douglas Fairbanks, Wal¬ 
lace Reid, Roscoe Arbuckle, Mack Sennett, Wm. S. Hart. 
Dorothy Dalton, Enid Bennett, Charles Ray, Lillian 
Gish, of our own and allied companies, as well as those 
produced by other companies with their most prominent 
stars. 

These films will carry home to the people of America 
as nothing else could possibly do, the great message of 
the United States Treasury Department, the Nation’s 
appeal to its people to provide the sinews of war, in the 
struggle against Prussianism. 

JESSE L. LASKY, 

First Vice President. 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

S :0 







Wid Said:- 

The decorative art title is 
a very important essential in 
maintaining the atmosphere 
of a production. 

When the Ince-Triangle 
art department brought this 
unusual innovation to the 
screen they certainly took a 
great step forward. 


MON RANDALL DESIGNED THE 
INCE TRIANGLE ART TITLES 













I 



Marketing Conditions Much Improved 

More things have happened during the past year to 
make the motion picture industry a modern business 
enterprise than during any previous year since its in¬ 
ception. 

The better motion pictures of today are being 
marketed in a manner befitting the importance of our 
gigantic business. The product is being sold not only 
to the exhibitor but to the public as well, along lines 
employed by large distributors in other modern in¬ 
dustries. 

Service is the keynote of all business success once 
the quality has become established. During the past 
year the exhibitor has been given more real service than 
ever before. Systematic sales plans have been embodied 
in the distribution of the motion picture product. The 
haphazard manner of distributing and exploiting the 
motion picture although not entirely extinct in some 
cases, is rapidly giving place to more businesslike 
methods. 

To my mind there has happened during the past year 
nothing more important in the industry than the tre¬ 
mendous progress in the distribution and presentation 
of motion pictures to a point where today nearly all pic¬ 
tures are being sold on their merit and the producer and 
exhibitor profit or lose absolutely commensurate with 
the quality of the product. In other words, since the 
Inception of the motion picture business it is only 


through the distribution and presentation developments 
of the past year that producers, distributors and exhibi¬ 
tors alike are liable to calculate their earnings in advance 
by virtue of the fact that we are now dealing in con¬ 
crete values. 

AL LICHTMAN, 

General Manager Distribution, Paramount- Artcraft. 


Cooperative Buying 

What I consider a most vital matter of importance 
in the past year is the possibility of co-operative buying 
by the exhibitor from the producer, as this is the avenue 
to the opportunity, which will very soon show the 
strength of the exhibitor. This co-operative booking 
will grow very fast and will surely weaken the Powers 
as soon as the exhibitor realizes his own strength. 

I.IARRY RAPF. 


Organization of Exhibitors’ Circuit 

I believe the most important happening was the or¬ 
ganization of the First National Exhibitors’ Circuit. I 
haven’t time to prepare the argument to back up my 
opinion. 

HERSCHEL STFART. 

Manager Old Mill Theatre, 

Dallas, Tex. 



Wid’s Read Everywhere 


That’s what executives and others who have 
been through the country during the last six 
months say. 

They found it bound and in constant use by 
alert, live wire exhibitors in every section. 

You know there are only a few thousand really 
important exhibitors in this country—and 
every one of them swears by ' 

Wicl’s Daily. 



























Independent Exchanges—What They Handle 

Any omissions in the following list of exchanges and the product they distribute are due to the 
failure of concerns to supply reports. 


ATLANTA, Ga.— 

Consolidated Film & Supply Co., Ill 

Walton St.—Zeppelin’s Last Raid, Those 
Who Pay, Her Fighting Chance, Just a 
Woman, The Belgian, Crucible of Life. 

Savini Films, Inc.—Gaumont productions, 
Zongar, The Perfect Model, Shorty Hamil¬ 
ton, Jester Comedies, Chaplin Keystone re¬ 
issue, Ivan productions, The Love Avenger. 


BALTIMORE, MD.— 

Palmore & Homand, 412 E. Lexington 
St.—W. H. Productions, Keystone Come¬ 
dies, Sherry Service. 

Variety Pictures Corp., 412 E. Baltimore 
St.-—Jester Comedies, Sunset Princess, My 
Husband’s Friend, The Woman’s Law, Cle¬ 
opatra, The Lonesome Trail, Finger of 
Justice. 


Major Films Co., 131 Columbus Ave.— 
Mothers of Liberty, Her Bargain, Lion of 
the Hills, Lonesome Trail, Girl Who 
Doesn’t Know, In the Hands of the Law, 
Boots and Saddles, Power of Evil, The 
Honor System, Little Mother, Mutt and 
Jeff Cartoons. 

Trimont Film Exchange—Sunset Prin¬ 
cess, Corruption. 


Boston Photoplay Co., 64 Broadway— 
Raffles, Public Defender, The Master 
Crook, Mother, Destiny Wills, Mormon 
Maid, Libertine, Loyalty, Humility, Wars, 
Women, Redemption. 

BUFFALO, N. Y.— 

Gardiner Syndicate, 47 W. Swan St.— 
Eagle’s Eye, Roscoe Arbuckle Comedies, 
Shorty Hamilton, Charlie Chaplin Come¬ 
dies, Mack Sennett Keystone Comedies, Wm. 
S. Hart Features, Bessie Barriscale Fea¬ 
tures, The Unborn, Birth, Neptune’s 
Daughter, One Day, Heart of New York, 
Birth of Man, How Molly Made Good, The 
Salamander, Birth of Character. 

CHICAGO, ILL.— 

Bee Hive, 220 S. State St.—Billy West 
Comedies. 


Success Film Production, Sloan Bldg.— 
Nine-tenths of the Law, The Belgian, 
Those Who Pay, Just a Worpan, Zeppelin’s 
Last Raid, Her Mistake, Crucible of Life, 
Devil’s Playground, Distributing Corp. $10- 
$20-$30 pictures. 

S. M. Company, Sloan Bldg.—A Woman’s 
Power, Eternal Peace. 

Union Film Co., Belmont Bldg.—Hart 
and Chaplin reissues. 


DALLAS, TEX.— 

Specialty Film Co., 107 So. Paul St.— 
Today, Mad Lover, Grain of Dust, Still 
Alarm, Berlin Via America, Denny From 
Ireland, Eyes of the World, Hand of Ven¬ 
geance, Hart re-issues, Bandit and the 
Preacher, Hell Hound of Alaska, The Bar¬ 
gain, Keystone and Kerrigan re-issues, 
Sins of Ambition, One Law for Both, Lust 
of Ages. 

Matinee Film Co., 107 So. St. Paul St.— 

Berlin via America, Eyes of the World, 
Grain of Dust, Mad Lover, Today, Cle¬ 
opatra, The Still Alarm, Denny From Ire¬ 
land, The Bandit and the Preacher, The 
Bargain, Hell Hound of Alaska, The Hand 
of Vengeance, Two-reel Keystone Comedy 
re-issues, Two-reel Kerrigan re-issues. 

Southwestern Art Dramas, Inc.—1917*4 
Commerce St.—Billy West Comedies, Jes¬ 
ter Comedies, Shorty Hamilton, W. S. 
Hart two-reelers, Four Square Productions, 
Stolen Orders, The Perfect Model, My Hus¬ 
band’s Friend, Chaplin re-issues, Eagle’s 
Eye. 

Consolidated Film and Supply Co., 190014 
Commerce St.—Universal Jewel and Blue¬ 
bird Productions. 

True Film Co., 1911J4 Commerce St.— 
The Whip, Babbling Tongues, The Melting 
Pot, Beating Back. 

Southern States Film Co., 1900J4 Com¬ 
merce St.—Zeppelin’s Last Raid, Belgian 
Her Fighting Chance, Just a Woman, Cru¬ 
cible of Life. Those Who Pay, Chaplin 
re-issues, W. H. Productions. 

First National Exhibitors’ Circuit, 1744 
Curtis St.—Alimony, Empty Pockets, 
Mighty London, The Sign Invisible, Amer¬ 
ica Is Ready, Sealed Orders, Where Are 
My Children, For Humanity’s Sake, The 
Cold Deck, On Trial, Bew T are of Strangers, 
Idle Wives, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, 
Mutt & Jeff Comedies, Christie Comedies, 
God’s Law, The Fall of the Romanoffs, 
Dog’s Life, Shoulder Arms, Pershing’s Cru¬ 
saders, My Four Years in Germany, Italy’s 
Flaming Front, Gaumont News, Gaumont 
Graphic, The War Bonnet, Roundup, A 
Trip Through China, Passing of Third 
Floor Back, Tarzan of the Apes, Mothers of 
Liberty, The Still Alarm, The Light 
Within, The Life Mask, Daughter of Des¬ 
tiny, Tempered Steel, Tarzan’s Romance, 
Rex Beach Pictures. 


DES MOINES, IOWA— 

Yale Photoplay Co., 702 Mulberry St.— 
The Whip, Who’s Your Neighbor, Zep¬ 
pelin’s Last Raid, Those Who Pay, Nine- 
tenths of the Law, The Master Crook, Be¬ 
ware of Strangers, Italian Battlefront, The 
Belgian, Crucible of Life, The Public De¬ 
fender. 

Dawn Masterplay Co., 707 Owen Bldg.— 
Hearts of the World, The Whip, Redemp¬ 
tion, Persuasive Peggy, Raffles, I Believe, 
Marvelous Maciste, Wrath of the Gods, 
Zeppelin’s Last Raid, The Belgian, Those 
Who Pay, The Eleventh Commandment, 
Nine-tenths of the Law, Crucible of Life, 
Joan the Woman. 


BOSTON, MASS.— 

American Feature Film Co., 60 Church 
St.—The Slacker, Draft 258, Blue Jeans, 
Revelation, Lest We Forget, Legion of 
Death, My Own U. S., Million Dollar Dol¬ 
lies, Toys of Fate, To Hell With the Kaiser, 
King in Khaki, L’Occident, Whirl of Life, 
Heart of Maryland, Even as You and I, 
Cold Deck, The Whip, Masque of Life, 
Bar Sinister, Call of Her People, Beware 
of Strangers, Price of a Good Time, Co-re¬ 
spondent, Man Without a Country, Sirens 
of the Sea, Pay Me, Come Through, Mother 
O’ Mine, Model’s Confession, Risky Road, 
Scarlet Drop, Two Souled Woman, Bride’s 
Awakening, Doctor and the Woman, Soul 
for Sale, Beast of Berlin. 

Eastern Feature Film Co., 57-59 Church 
St.—Struggle Everlasting, Today, Acciden¬ 
tal Honeymoon, Mad Lover, Life or Honor, 
Nine-tenths of the Law, The Devil’s Play¬ 
ground, Crucible of Life, The Warrior, My 
Husband’s Friend, One Law for Both, Bab¬ 
bling Tongues, The Liar, Married in Name 
Only. 

Foursquare Pictures, 16 Piedmont St.—Sin 
Woman, Fighting Chance, Silent Witness, 
One Hour, Fringe of Society, Great White 
Trail, Submarine Eye, Cast-off, Whither 
Thou Goest, Will You Marry Me, Men, Nat¬ 
ural Law, Lost Chord, Zongar, Eagle’s Eye. 

R. D. Marson Attraction Co., 26 Piedmont 
St.—Jester Comedies, Idle Wives, Lust of 
Ages, Persuasive Peggy, City of Purple 
Dreams, Garden of Allah, Grain of Dust. 

Gordon & Mayer Film Corp., 35 Pied¬ 
mont St.—First National Exhibitors Prod¬ 
uct, Jewel Productions, Universal Specials, 
Anita Stewart productions, Gaumont News 
Weekly. 

Edward Klein Film Enterprises—I Be¬ 
lieve. 


Bear State Film Co., 220 So State St.— 
The Vigilantes. 

Classics Films Dist. Co., 208 So. La Salle 
St.—Belgium, Kingdom of Grief, French 
Official War Films. Heroes of the Air. 

Commonwealth Pictures Corp., 220 So. 
State Et.—Spanuth’s Vod-a-vil. 

Lee Bell Co., 64 Randolph St.—Toyland 
Animated films. 

Frleder Film Corp., 215 W. Randolph St. 
—Birth of Democracy. 

Silee Film Exchange, 402 Consumers 
Bldg.—Mother of Liberty, City of Purple 
Dreams, Whither Thou Goest, Lust of 
Ages, Mother Love and the Law, Trooper 
44, In Treason’s Grasp, Should She Obey. 

Supreme Film Productions, 5 So. Wabash 
Ave.—God’s Man. 

Unity Photograph Co., 207 S. Wabash 
Ave.—Berlin via America, Accidental Hon¬ 
eymoon, Struggle Everlasting, Hart re¬ 
issues, Birth of Democracy, I Believe, 
Who’s Your Neighbor, Babbling Tongues, 
Jester Comedies, Souls Redeemed, Rex 
Beach Travelogue, Billy West Comedies. 

• 

CINCINNATI, O— 

McMahan & Jackson Film Co., 23 Opera 
Place—Keystone Comedies, Hart 2-reel fea¬ 
tures, The Dumb Girl of Portici, Neptune’s 
Daughter, Purity, Diana’s Inspiration, The 
Witching Hour, The Burglar and the Lady, 
The Waif, Should a Girl Be Told, How 
Molly Made Good. 

Masterpiece Film Attractions, Seventh 
and Main Sts.—Lust of Ages, Beware of 
Strangers, Garden of Allah, Actors Fund 
Reel, Rex Beach Adventure Pictures, Re¬ 
demption, Two Gun Man, Struggle Everlast¬ 
ing, Cold Deck, Bandit and Preacher, Ac¬ 
cidental Honeymoon, Grain of Dust, Lib¬ 
ertine, Hell Hound of Alaska. 

CLEVELAND, O.— 




ABOUT THE “ FIRST NATIONAL” 

(The First National Exhibitors’ Circuit) 

General Offices, 6 West 48th Street, New York, N. Y. 



An Organization composed of Theatre Owners which purchases productions for its members own theatres. 
Each member controls the productions so purchased in his own territory 

After First National Attractions are presented at First National Theatres they are booked to other theatres 
through tne following: 

FIRST NATIONAL EXCHANGES 


A ddress 

833 So. Broadway, 

Los Angeles, California 

134 Golden Gate Avenue, 

San Francisco, California 


Franchise Holder Territory 

T. L. Tally ... So. Cal., including counties of San Luis, 

Obispo, Kern, San Bernardino and all south 
thereof. All Arizona. 

Turner & Dahnken . California, north of counties of San Luis 

Obispo, Kern and San Bernardino. All Ne¬ 
vada and Hawaii. 


1744 Curtis Street, 

Denver, Colorado 
1200 Fourth Avenue, 

Seattle, Washington 
1318 Standard Bank Building, 
Vancouver, B. C. 

110 S. State Street, 

Chicago, Illinois 
24 W. Washington Street, 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
314 So. 13 St., 

Omaha, Neb. 

New Film Building, Cor. John 

R. & Elizabeth St., Detroit, Mich. 
400 Film Exchange Building, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

New Grand Central Theatre, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

402 Sloan Building, 

Cleveland, Ohio 
419 Ninth St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

509 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 

509 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 

20 Winchester Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

1339 Vine Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

300 Westinghouse Building, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

712 Poydras Street, 

New Orleans, La. 

1920 Main Street, 

Dallas, Texas 
Rex Theatre Building, 

Louisville, Ky. 

729 Seventh Avenue, 

New York City 
8 McGill College Avenue, 

Montreal, Can. 

904 E. Broad Street, 

Richmond, Va. 


Swanson & Nolan. 

Exhibitors’ Film Exchange. 

W. P. Dewees . 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer. 

H. Liebler Co. 

A. H. Blank Enterprises. 

J. H. Kunsky . 

Thomas Saxe ... 

William Sievers . 

The First Natl. Exhibitors’ 

Circuit, Inc., of Ohio. 

Tom Moore . 

First Nat. Exchange, Inc. 

Jacob Fabian & E. I. Church. 

Gordon & Mayer Film Corp.... 

H. O. Schwalbe . 

J. B. Clark & R. A. Rowland. 

E. V. Richards, Jr.. 

E. H. Plulsey . 

Fred Levy ... 

Autsralasian Films, Ltd. 

Henry Brouse. 

E. Ferrandini .;. 


Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming and all 
counties of Idaho, south of Idaho County. 
All of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Montana. 

All counties north of and including Idaho Co. 
All Canada west of and including Fort William 
and Port Arthur. 

Illinois. 

Indiana. 

Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. 

Michigan. 

Minnesota, North and South Dakota and Wis¬ 
consin. 

Missouri. 


Ohio. 

Maryland, District of Columbia and Delaware. 

New York. 

New Jersey 

New England States. 

Eastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jer¬ 
sey. All counties in Pennsylvania east of 
Fulton, Huntington, Center, Clinton and 
Potter. 

West Virginia and Pennsylvania. All of Penn¬ 
sylvania counties west of and including Ful¬ 
ton, Huntington, Center, Clinton and Potter. 

Louisiana and Mississippi. 

Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma. 

Kentucky and Tennessee. 

All of Australia. 

All Canada east of but not including Fort 
William and Port Arthur. 

Georgia, Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, 
Virginia and North Carolina. 


Distributors of 



Million Dollar 
Comedies 





























Northwestern Consolidated Film Co., 

2020 Third Ave.—Educational, Film Corp., 
Scenics and Educationals, Ditmars’ Nature 
Pictures. Gaumont News and Graphic. 

Foursquare Pictures, Inc., 304 Joseph 
Mack Bldg.—Today, Mad Lover, Four¬ 
square Pictures. 

Joseph Horwitz, 304 Mack Bldg.—Today, 
The Mad Lover, Bar Sinister, The Sin Wo¬ 
man, Her Fighting Chance, Madame Sherry, 
Silent Witness, Great White Trail, One 
Hour, Fringe of Society, Submarine Eye, 
The Cast-off, Will You Marry Me, Men, 
The Natural Law. 

Strand Features, 201 New Film Bldg.— 
Charlie Chaplin re-issues, Fatty Arbuckle, 
W. H. Productions, S. A. Lynch two- 
reel Comedies, Exclusive Feature Films, 
Hart re-issues. Who’s Afraid of the Hun. 


Standard Film Service, 602 New Film 
Bldg.—Billy West two-reel Comedies, 
Christy Comedies, Mack Sennett re-lssues, 
Shorty Hamilton, J. Warren Kerrigan re¬ 
issues, Mutt and Jeff, Mothers of Liberty, 
Cleopatra, Would You Forget, Peg of the 
Sea, Zongar, Art Dramas. 


State Film, 302 New Film Bldg.-—Frozen 
Warning, Beware of Strangers, The Bar¬ 
gain. Bandit and the Preacher, Hell Hound 
of Alaska, Lone Avenger, Souls Redeemed, 
Deemster, Mormon Maid. The Snail, Denny 
From Ireland, The Peddler. 


Victor Film Co., 302 New Film Bldg.— 
The Rainbow, The Accomplice, Rosie 
O’Grady, The Adventurer, Lash of Des¬ 
tiny, Whoever Finds the Wife, Her Good 
Name. God of Little Children, Infidelity, 
The Moral Code, It May Be Your Daugh¬ 
ter, Cinderella and the Magic Slipper, The 
Penny Philanthropist, Salvation Nell, The 
Masque of Life, The Libertine, The Un¬ 
written Law, Conquest of Canaan. 


Madison Film Exchange, 607 New Film 
Bldg.—The Crisis, Enlighten Thy Daugh¬ 
ter, Tillie’s Punctured Romance, Whirl of 
Life, Idle Wives, On Trial, Lust of the 
Ages. Whither Thou Goest, Alimony, 
Daughter of Destiny, My Four Years in 
Germany, Passing of the Third Floor 
Back, Tarzan of the Apes. Fall of the 
Romanoffs, Light Within, Chaplin Come¬ 
dies, Gaumont News and Graphic, Ro¬ 
mance of Tarzan. Tempered Steel. Life 
Mask, Sign Invisible, New Italian Battle- 
front Pictures. 


GREENVILLE, S. C.— 

Greenville Film & Supplv Co.—The Kai¬ 
ser Himself, Daughter of War. 


KANSAS CITY, MO.— 

Emerald Film Service, Inc., 311 Floyd 
Bldg.—Lion of the Hills, Fighting in 
France, W. H. Productions. 

Liberty Film Co., 4242 Charlotte St.—A 
Slacker’s Heart, Tillie’s Punctured Ro¬ 
mance, Whirl of Life. 

Yale Photoplay Co., 922 Oak St.—Same 
subjects as Des Moines office. 


LOUISVILLE, KY.— 

Big Feature Rights Corp., Rex Theatre 
Bldg.—Joan the Woman, Whither Thou 
Goest, Cry of Peace, Neptune’s Daughter, 
Silver Threads Among the Gold, Where 
Are My Children. 


For Kentucky' and Tennessee—The New 
Million Dollar Chaplin Comedies, Petrova 
Pictures, Empty Pockets, Babbling 
Tongues, Today, One Law for Both, The 
Mad Lover. Marvelous Maciste, The Sign 
Invisible, Alimony, The Little Girl Next 
Door, The Whip, The Deemster, On Trial, 
The New Lockwood-Allison re-issues, Mar¬ 
ried in Name Only, Sins .of Ambition, The 
Struggle Everlasting, The Accidental 
Honeymoop, Traitors Within the Gates, 
The Romance of Tarzan, Italy’s Flaming 
Front. Tarzan of the Apes, The Masque 
of Life, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under 
the Sea, My Husband’s Friend, A Woman’s 
Law, Raffles. 


LOS ANGELES, CAL.— 

M & R Feature Film Exchange, 730 Olive 
St.—Lust of the Ages, Warrior, Clansman, 
Eyes of the World, Ramona, Ivan Pictures. 


MEMPHIS, TENN.— 

Kaufman Specials, 52 So. 4th St.—Shorty 
Hamilton, single-reel patriotic specials, 
Topics of the Day, Oro Features, Hart two- 
reels, Mad Lover, On Trial, Alimony, Mar¬ 
velous Maciste. 


MILWAUKEE. WIS — 

Walter A Baier Film Co., Toy Bldg.—A 
Slacker’s Heart, Civilization, Cold Deck, 
Where Are My Children? Neptune’s Daugh¬ 
ter. 

Bee Hive Exchange, Toy Bldg.—Arbuckle 
Comedies, Ditmars’ Animal Pictures, New¬ 
man Travelogues, Mexico Today, Happy 
Hooligan and Katzenjammer Cartoons, 
Hits in Photoplays, Ford Weekly, Shorty 
Hamilton re-issues. 


MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— 

James V. Bryson, Inc., Bijou Theatre 
Bldg.—Twenty Thousand Leagues Under 
the Sea, Come Through. 

B. N. Judell, Inc., Film Exchange Bldg.— 
Purity, Carmen of the Klondike, Chaplin 
re-issues, Salisbury Pictures of Wild Ani¬ 
mal Life. 

Frieman Film Corp., Film Exchange 
Bldg.—Whip, Grain of Dust, Lust of the 
Ages, Hart, Talmadge, Fairbanks and 
Keenan re-issues. 

Supreme Feature Film Co., Film Ex¬ 
change Bldg.—Raffles, The Amateur 
Cracksman, Redemption, Zepellin’s Last 
Raid, Just a Woman, Those Who Pay, 
The Belgian, Nine-tenths of the Law, Cru¬ 
cible of Life, The Devil’s Playground, 
Civilization, Where Are My Children? 

Westcott Film -Corp., Film Exchange 
Bldg.—Intolerance, Berlin Via America, 
The Deemster, Mother, The Warrior, Her 
Husband’s Friend, I Believe, A Modern 
Lorelei, Loyalty, Masque of Life, Glory, 
Little Girl Next Door, A Mormon Maid, 
Rex Beach Traveloques, Humility, Christie 
Comedies. 


NEWARK, N. J.— 

Hatch Film Co., 284 Market St.—The 
Whip, The Still Alarm. 


NEW ORLEANS, LA.— 

First Natl. Exhibitors’ Circuit, 712 Poy- 
dras St.—The Frozen Warning, Subma¬ 
rine Eye, Billy West Comedies, Redemp¬ 
tion, Educational Film Corp. releases, First 
National releases. 


Pearce Films, 610 Canal St.—Zongar, 
Lone Avenger, A Mormon Maid, Enlighten 
Thy Daughter, Warfare of the Flesh, Little 
Girl Next Door, Cleopatra, Berlin Via 
America. Hart re-issues, The Human Or¬ 
chid, Shorty Hamilton, Still Alarm, A 
Grain of Dust, Chaplin and Keystone re¬ 
issues, Eyes of the World, Mad Lover, 
Today, Birth of Democracy. 


NEW YORK CITY— 

K. & R. Film Co., Inc., 126 W. 46th St.— 
Masque of Life, Silver Threads Among the 
Gold, Neptune’s Daughter, Melting Pot, 
Littlest Rebel, Whirl of Life, Fall of a 
Nation, After the Ball, Birth, Ireland a 
Nation, Tillie’s Punctured Romance, How 
Molly Made Good. 

Hearts of the World, Longacre Bldg.— 
Headquarters for state rights distribu¬ 
tion of Hearts of the World. 

Interstate Film Exchange, 729 Seventh 
Ave.—Billy West Comedies, Ford Weekly. 

Merit Film Corp., 130 W. 46th St.—Ivan 
Productions. 

Frank Gersten, Inc., 130 W. 46th St.—Re¬ 
demption, Parentage, I Believe, Just a Wo¬ 
man, Zeppelin’s Last Raid, Those Who Pay, 
Crucible of Life, Devil’s Playground, To¬ 
day, Mad Lover, Struggle Everlasting, Ac¬ 
cidental Honeymoon, Staking His Life, 
Who’s Afraid of the Him, The Belgian. 

Williamson Submarine Film Corp., Long- 
acre Bldg.—The Submarine Eye, William¬ 
son’s Submarine Expedition. 

The Film Market, Inc., Times Bldg.—Sus¬ 
picion, What Becomes of the Children? 

M. H. Hoffman, 729 7th Ave.—Suspicion, 
The Craving, Lost Chord, Grain of Dust, 
Men, The Cast-off, Fringe of Society, Great 
White Trail, One Hour, Should She Obey, 
Silent Witness, Her Fighting Chance. Sin 
Woman, Bar Sinister, Trip Through China, 
Eagle’s Eye, Wharton Comedies. For 
Northern New Jersey.—Missing Link. Bride 
of Hate, The Phanto'm, Children of the 
House. 

Magnet Film Exchange, 729 7th Ave.— 
Mickey, 2-reel Mack Sennett Comedies, 
Charlie Chaplin Comedies, Shorty Hamil¬ 
ton Comedies, Fatty Arbuckle Comedies, 
The Two Gun Man, Bandit and the Preach¬ 
er, Hell Hound of Alaska, Staking His 
Life, Satan’s Pawn, The Convict, The 
Straight Road. 

Arrow Film Corp., Times Bldg.—Acci¬ 
dental Honeymoon, Struggle Everlasting, 
Eyes of the World, Ramona, Million Dollar 
Mystery, Women’s Law, Sunset Princess, 
Kerrigan re-issues, Lockwood-Allison re-is¬ 
sues, Inspiration, Finger of Justice. My 
Husband’s Friend. Her Aviator, Huns 
Within Our Gates. 

Producers Feature Service, 729 7th Ave.— 
God’s Man, Whither Thou Goest, Glory, A 
Mormon Maid, The Land Just Over Yon¬ 
der. The Marriage Bond. Lust of the Ages, 
I Believe, A Perfect Model, My Husband’s 
Friend, The Wife Who Wouldn’t Tell. 

Ernest Shipman, 17 West 44th St.—Moth¬ 
er, I Need Y T ou, Lady of the Dugout, The 
Crime of the Hour, Nugget in the Rough, 
Berlin via America. 

Federal Film Service, 145 West 45th St.—- 
Biograph and Selig re-issues—Mack Sen¬ 
nett Comedies, Ohas. Murray and Fred 
Mace Comedies. 

Mothers of Liberty Picture Co., 145 West 
45th St.—Mothers of Liberty, Huns Within 
Our Gates. 


Mr. Exhibitor! 

Follow the Successful Pictures! 

% 


HARRY RAPF 

Presents 

FLORENCE REED 

in 

“The Struggle Everlasting” 

Directed by James Kirkwood 
Featuring Milton Sills and Irving Cummings 

This production has broken records in New York City for continuous booking; having played more 

than 500 days and still going big. 

And the Picture Classic of the Year 

Captain Robert Warwick 

in 

“The Accidental Honeymoon” 

Supported by ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN 
Directed by Leonce Perret 


Coming Soon—Big Photo Melodrama 

“The Sins of the Children” 

by COSMO HAMILTON 

Adapted from his world-wide read novel which ran serially in the Red Book, and now published 

in book form. 

Featuring ALMA HANLON, STUART HOLMES and MAHLON HAMILTON 


HARRY RAPF PRODUCTIONS 

1564 Broadway, New York 















Elk Photo Plays, Inc., 126 West 46th St. 
—Souls Redeemed, Who’s Tour Neighbor?, 
The Natural Law, Shorty Hamilton series. 

Emanee Film Co., 145 West 45th St.—W. 
S. Hart re-issues—The Crisis, Are Passions 
Inherited, Purity, Ella Wheeler Wilcox 
Poems, Temptation. 

The Pioneer Film Corp., 126 West 46th 
St.—The Cold Deck, Redemption, The Mad 
LoVer, Submarine Eye, Today, Garden of 
Allah, Civilization, Hate, Shame, Wl^o’s 
Your Neighbor?, City of Purple Dreams, 
Who Shall Take My Life, The Still Alarm, 
Wives of Men. 

Modern Feature Photo Plays, Inc., 729 

7th Ave.-—Lash of Destiny, Whoso Findeth 
a Wife, The Rainbow, Infidelity, God of 
Little Children, Her Good Name, Rosie 
O’Grady, The Accomplice, The Adventurer, 
The Moral Code, Pride and The Devil, The 
Cloud, A Man and the Woman, The Law 
That Failed, The Inevitable, Great Bradley 
Mystery, A Mother’s Ordeal, The Auction 
of Virtue, Little Miss Fortune, Mystic 
Hour, A Song of Sixpence, House of Cards, 
A Mute Appeal, The Golden God, The Road 
Between, Miss Deception, When You and I 
Were Young, Eye of Envy, Think It Over, 
Little Samaritan, Behind the Mask, Blood 
of His Fathers, The Peddler, Who Knows, 
Loyalty, Peg O’ the Sea, In the Hands of 
the Law, Girl Who Doesn’t Know, Con¬ 
quest of Canaan, Boots and Saddles, Power 
of Evil, Common Sense Brackett, Mother, 
House of Temperley, A Slacker’s Heart, 
Public Defender, Master Crook, Power, 
Marriage Trap. 


OMAHA, NEB.— 

A. H. Blank Enterprises, 314 So. 13th 
St.—Pershing’s Crusaders, My Four Years 
in Germany, Charlie Chaplin Series, Tar¬ 
zan of the Apes, Fall of the Romanoffs, 
Passing of the Third Floor Back, Raffles, 
The Liar, The Frozen Warning, The 
Deemster, On Trial, Empty Pockets, The 
Submarine Eye, Alimony, The Sign Invis¬ 
ible, The Cold Deck, Human Clay, Sins of 
Ambition, One Law for Both, Anita Stew¬ 
art Series, Italy’s Flaming Front, Romance 
of Tarzan. 

Fontenelle Feature Film Co., 1504 Har¬ 
ney St.—War’s Women, Witching Hour, 
Unwritten Law, Escape, Battle of Gettys¬ 
burg, Wrath of the Gods, Diana the 
Huntress, Masque of Life, Billy West Com¬ 
edies, Hart, Chaplin, Keystone re-issues. 


PHILADELPHIA, PA.— 

Monarch Film Service, 1220 Vine St.— 
Lillian Walker Productions, Sunbeam 
Films, Art Dramas and Wm. Hodkinson 
Productions. 


PITTSBURGH, PA.— 

Liberty Film Renting Co., 938 Penn Ave. 

—Lust of the Ages, Submarine’s Eye, Bab¬ 
bling Tongues, Sins of Ambition, One Law 
for Both. 

Supreme Photoplay Productions, 265 No. 
13th St—The Still Alarm, Where Are My 
Children, Masque of Life, Idle Wives, Ital¬ 
ian Battlefront. 

Day Film Corp., 412 Ferry St.—Her Mis¬ 
take, Producers’ Distributing Corp. re¬ 
leases, Raffles, Lockwood-Allison Series, 
Sin Woman, Her Fighting Chance, Silent 
Witness, One Hour, Great White Trail, 


Marriage Bond, Whither Thou Goest, 
Fringe of Society, The Cast Off, The Deem¬ 
ster, Today, Mad Lover, Hate. 

First National Exhibitors’ Circuit, 300 
Westinghouse Bldg.—The Warrior, Tarzan 
of the Apes, On Trial, Modern Lorelei, 
Mother, Sign Invisible, Fall of the Roman¬ 
offs, Frozen Warning, Passing Third Floor 
Back, Empty Pockets, Beware of Strangers, 
Charlie Chaplin, (Specials) My Four Years 
in Germany, Pershing’s Crusaders, Civili¬ 
zation, Bar Sinister, 20,000 Leagues Under 
Sea, Garden of Allah, Italian Battlefront, 
Italy’s Flaming Front, Daughter of Des¬ 
tiny, Light Within, Life Mask, Tempered 
Steel. 


Hatch Film Co., 412 Ferry St.—Whip, 
Still Alarm. 

Deseret. Film Co., 52 Exchange PI.—Eyes 
of the World. God’s Man, Deemster, I Be¬ 
lieve, Persuasive Peggy, Today. Mad 
Lover, Zongar, Whip, Redemption, Unwrit¬ 
ten Law, Birth of a Nation, Spoilers, Til- 
lie’s Punctured Romance. 


SAN ANTONIO, TEX.— 

Independent Film Exchange, 205 Front 
Bldg.—Folly of a Life of Crime, Feature 
and Comedy re-issues. 

Consolidated Film Co., 90 Golden Gate 
Ave.—Educational Corp. Scenics and Educa¬ 
tional, National Film Service, Cartoons, 
Ditmars’ Nature Studies. 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— 

All Star Features Distributors, Inc., 191 

Golden Gate Ave.—Intolerance, Garden of 
Allah, Whip, 20,000 Leagues Under the 
Sea, Struggle Everlasting, Today, Two-gun 
Man, Hell Hound of Alaska, i.ibertine. Still 
Alarm, Civilization, Raffles. Grain of Dust, 
Nine-tenths of the Law, Accidental Hon¬ 
eymoon, Cold Deck, Bandit and 'Preacher, 
God’s Law, Carmen of the Klondike, Nat¬ 
ural Law. 

M & R Feature Film Exchange, 107 
Golden Gate Ave.—I van Productions, 
Mother, The Crisis, Eyes of the World, 
Ramona. 

Consolidated Film Corp., 90 Gates Ave.—- 
Educational Corp., Scenics and Education¬ 
al, Ditmars’ Nature Studies. 


SEATTLE, WASH.— 

De Luxe Feature Film Co., 2014 Third 
Ave.—Hearts of the World, Intolerance, 
Carmen of the Klondyke, The Garden of 
Allah, The Whip, Redemption, The Cold 
Deck, The Bargain, The Preacher and the 
Bandit, The Hellhound of Alaska, Two- 
reel Hart re-issues, Fairbanks re-issues, 
Keenan re-issues, Norma Talmadge re-is¬ 
sues, Grain of Dust, Song Hits in Photo¬ 
play, Little Girl Next Door, Would You 
Forgive. 

Greater Features Co., 2020 Third Ave.— 
Christie Comedies, one-reel Arbuckle re¬ 
issues, one and two-reel Chaplin re-issues, 
Mack-Sennett-Mutual-Key stone two-reel 
Comedies, A Mormon Maid, Where Are 
My Children, Conquest of Canaan, The 
Dumb Girl of Portici, The Witching Hour, 
Dante’s Inferno, Who’s Your Neighbor, 
Eyes of the World. 

W. S. Brewster Attractions, 2020 Third 
Ave.—Crisis. Warrior, Submarine Eye. 
Masque of Life. 


L. J. Schlaifer Attractions, 2022 Third 
Ave.—Traitor Within Our Gates, Sins of 
Ambition, One Law for Both, Babbling 
Tongues, Married in Name Only, Parent¬ 
age, Human Clay, His Wives, Her Sur¬ 
render, A Son of Strife, The Girl Who Did 
Not Care, Concealed Truth, A Mother’s 
Confession, Sex Lure, A Faded Flower, 
Birth of Democracy, Idle Wives, Hate, 
Woman and the Beast, The Unborn, Web 
of Life, Hero of France, Where Cowboy Is 
King, Steel Industry of the Northwest, 
The Evergreen Highway, Hart re-issues, 
Zongar. • 

Lambson Film Exchange, 2016 Third Ave. 
—War’s Women, Girl Who Doesn’t Know. 

Leon Bories, 2016 Third Ave.—Eagle’s 
Eye, Foursquare Pictures, releases of U. S. 
Booking Corp. 

Grace M. Sanderson, 2016 Third Ave.—• 
Finger of Justice. 

Exhibitors Film Exchange, Inc., 1200 
Fourth Ave.—First National Exhibitors 
Circuit Pictures, Pershing’s Crusaders, Ro¬ 
mance of Tarzan, Still Alarm, Raffles, 
Empty Pockets, Tarzan of the Apes, Italy’s 
Flaming Front, On Trial, Alimony, Sign 
Invisible, Fall of the Romanoffs, Passing 
of the Third Floor Back. 

Liberty Feature Film Co., Inc.—Mothers 
of Liberty, The Deemster, Jungle Come¬ 
dies. 

Hodupp Town Photoplay Co., 3431 Olive 
St.—Deemster, Berlin Via America, Hand 
of Vengeance, Shorty Hamilton, Kerrigan 
re-issues, Gaumont News and Graphic, Two 
Men and a Woman, Married in Name Only, 
Idle Wives, Sins of Ambition, Souls Re¬ 
deemed, Denny From Ireland, Peg O’ The 
Sea, Weaver of Life, The Liar, Sunset 
Princess, Loyalty, Humility, Web of Life, 
Blood of His Father, Where Are My 
Children. 

Grand Central Film Co., Grand and Lu¬ 
cas Aves.—Four Years in Germany, Tar¬ 
zan of the Apes, Romance of Tarzan, Per¬ 
shing’s Crusaders, Passing of the Third 
Floor Back, Italy’s Flaming Front, Pe¬ 
trova Productions, Empty Pockets, Ali¬ 
mony, On Trial, I Believe, Frozen Warn¬ 
ing, Sign Invisible. The Crisis, Enlighten¬ 
ment, Beware of Strangers, Mo-Toy Com¬ 
edies. 

Sam Werner, 3628 Olive St.—Witching 
Hour, Diana, Jester Comedies, Hart re¬ 
issues. Mothers of Liberty, Who Shall Take 
My Life?, City of Purple Dreams, Helen 
Gardner in Cleopatra. 

United Film Service, 3628 Olive St.—Billy 
West Comedies, Hart re-issues, Ford Edu¬ 
cational. 


WASHINGTON, D. C.— 

Samuel Cummins, 617 E. St., N. W.—Sub¬ 
marine Eye, Enlighten Thy Daughter, 
Birth. 

First National Exhibitors Circuit, Exhib¬ 
itors Film Exchange, 420 Ninth St., N. W. 
—Mad Lover, Today, Mothers of Liberty,. 
Two-gun Man. Would You Forgive, Re¬ 
demption, Her Bargain. Guilty Wife, Strug¬ 
gle Everlasting, Accidental Honeymoon, 
Shorty Hamilton, Joan the Woman. Kerri¬ 
gan re-issues, Punch Paragraphs, Literary 
Digest. 

Super Film Attractions, 1209-11 E St., 
N. W.—Zeppelin’s Last Raid, Belgian, 
Those Who Pay, Just a Woman. Nine- 
tenths of the Law. Crucible of Life. The 
Whip, The Still Alarm. Lion of the Hills, 
Tillie’s Punctured Romance, Cold Deck, 


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THE MOTIVE MOTION PICTURE CO. 

1919 SOUTH MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

ANNOUNCE 

The release of a series of stories from the pen of 

UPTON SINCLAIR 

Author of 

THE JUNGLE, KING COAL, etc., and UPTON SINCLAIR’S MAGAZINE 
Each subject will treat in Sinclair’s masterful way, of one phase of the struggles of 

ORGANIZED LABOR 

To obtain JUSTICE AND A LIVING WAGE, and to offer a SOLUTION 

of the problem, FAIR to 

THE PUBLIC, CAPITAL AND LABOR. 

The FIRST RELEASE (about January First) will treat of the conditions that 
brought about the first contract ever entered into between the 
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT and 
A LABOR UNION, “FOR THE PERIOD OF THE WAR” 

The PUBLIC are entitled to the TRUTH and in this picture they will get 
it and can decide for themselves the question of 

GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP 

A sweet, human interest story of great ENTERTAINMENT VALUE will 
carry this message to the AMERICAN PUBLIC and will have an added 
appeal to the WAGE EARNERS OF AMERICA. 

THE BROTHERHOOD OF RAILROAD TRAINMEN have endorsed offi¬ 
cially the first picture and the officers of this company are all prominent 
members of the Brotherhoods. 

THE BOX OFFICE VALUE of this series will be the greatest ever offered 
to the Exhibitor. 

The cast will include at least SIX STARS each of them to have at least 50 
per cent, of the drawing power of 

MARY PICKFORD 

This will give you a 300 per cent, picture aside from the NEW and NOVEL 
FEATURES introduced for the first time by means of the HORSLEY 
DOUBLE EXPOSURE CAMERA, and the HORSLEY AUTOTALKING 
DEVICE (Patented October 8th, 1918). 

This company has been granted the first license under the patents of DAVID 
HORSLEY, and have engaged his services for the exclusive benefit of this 
company in the production of this series. 

The company is capitalized at $200,000, all paid in and is prepared to spend 
it all on the first subject in order that it may be the best BOX OFFICE 
PICTURE ever released. 

GEORGE S. WILLIAMS, President 
B. M. LYON, Secretary & Treasurer 


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un Trial, Raffles, The Amateur Cracksman, 
War as It Really Is, Parentage, Loyalty, 
Her Condoned Sin, Are Passions Inher¬ 
ited?, Wrath of the Gods, Purity, Keren¬ 
sky and the Russian Revolution, Hart, 
Fairbanks, Keenan, Talmadge re-issues. 

CANADIAN EXCHANGES 

Canadian Universal Film Co., Limited. 
Branches in St. John, N. B.; Montreal, 
Que.; Toronto, Ont.; Winnipeg, Man.; Cal¬ 
gary, Alta., and Vancouver, B. C. Head 
offices for Canada, 106 Richmond St. west, 
Toronto, Ont. Clair Gague, general man¬ 
ager for Canada. Canadian distributors for 
Universal products. 

Regal Films, Ltd., head offices, Adelaide 
St., Toronto, Ont. Branches in St. John, 
Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary and 
Vancouver. Canadian distributors for 
Metro, World, Triangle. 

Exhibitors’ Distributing Corporation— 

Paralta Plays and specials, such as The 
Still Alarm, Nine-tenths of the Law, Ivan 
Productions. Have taken over the rights 
on pictures formerly held by Superfea¬ 
tures, Ltd., and Globe Films, Ltd. Also 
handles W. H. Productions and such spe¬ 
cials as Civilization, The Lone Wolf, Eyes 
of the World, Ramona, The Warrior, The 
Superman, The Spoilers, The Belgian, 
Those Who Pay, Bar Sinister, Eagle’s Eye 
Serial, Billy West Comedies. Head of¬ 
fices and branch, Toronto; branches, Win¬ 
nipeg, Montreal and St. John. Charles L. 
Stephenson, general manager. 


Famous Players Film Service, Ltd. Ex¬ 
ecutive offices, Toronto; branches, Toronto, 
Montreal, Winnipeg, St. John, Calgary and 
Vancouver. Holders of the Canadian Para- 
mount-Artcraft franchise. Also distribut¬ 
ors of Select Program and Goldwyn Pro¬ 
gram in Canada. 

Monarch Film Co., Ltd. Subsidiary of 
the Famous Players Film Service, Ltd. 
Select and Goldwyn Programs from this 
office. 

Mutual Film Corporation.—Head offices 
for Canada in Montreal. Branches in To¬ 
ronto and Canadian West. Distributes Mu¬ 
tual output in Canada. 

Vitagraph. Head offices for Canada in 
Toronto. Branches, Toronto, St. John, 
Montreal and Winnipeg. 

Specialty Film Import, Ltd.—Head of¬ 
fices in Montreal. Branches, Montreal, St. 
John, Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and 
Winnipeg. Holders of the Canadian Path* 
franchise. 

Fox Film Corporation, Ltd. Head of¬ 
fices for Canada in Toronto. Branches, 
Montreal, Toronto and St. John. Western 
Canada business handled by Dominion Ex¬ 
clusives, with head office in Vancouver, 
B. C., and branches in Vancouver, Calgary 
and Winnipeg. 

General Film Co. (Canada), Ltd. Head 
offices in Montreal, with branch in To¬ 
ronto. Distributor of General Film Co.’s 
products in Canada. 


DIVISIONS OF FOREIGN TERRITORIES 

SOUTH AMERICA— 

West Indies—Including Cuba, Santa Do¬ 
mingo, Hayti and Venezuela. 

Central America—Including the Central 
American countries proper. 

The Argentine—Argentina, Paraguay and 
Uruguay. 

Brazil. 

Chill, Bolivia and Peru. 


EUROPE— 

United Kingdom—England, Scotland, Ire¬ 
land and Wales. 

Scandinavian Countries—Norway, Swe¬ 
den, Denmark and Finland. 

France and Switzerland. 

Spain and Portugal. 

The Balkan States and Egypt. 

Holland. 

Belgium. 

Russia. 

Australia is a separate unit. 

The Orient—India, Burma, Ceylon, China, 
Japan, Philippines, Straits Settlements. 

NOTE.—These divisions comprise ap¬ 
proximately the sections into which the 
world’s foreign market Is divided. How¬ 
ever, there is no set and fast rule in mak¬ 
ing sales. 


WID’S DAILY $1 „ 
BINDERS A — 

A binder keeps your copy orderly 
and makes it readily convenient 
for reference. 









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NATIONAL FILM CORPORATION 

OF AMERICA 

during the forthcoming year 

VV7LL PRODUCE 


6 De Luxe Specials starring 

“DAINTY” BILLIE RHODES 


26 Capitol Comedies 

with 

“SMILING BILL” PARSONS 

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TWO 100% SUPER-DRAMAS 

That will equal or surpass the records of “Tarzan of the Apes ” and “Romance of Tarzan ” 


NATIONAL FILM CORPORATION OF AMERICA 


HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 




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4 







The Year In Headlines 


September, 1917— 

American Exhibitors Association officials meet in New 
York to complete details of recently formed organization. 

Fox asks for injunction to restrain Major Funkhouser 
from preventing the showing in Chicago of “The Spy.” 

Virginia exhibitors hold convention at Ocean View, Va. 

Anita Stewart signs contract with Louis B. Mayer of 
Boston to appear in features. 

Proclamation issued by President Wilson prevents 
exporting of film without special license. 

Herbert Brenon’s “Fall of the Romanoffs” has initial 
showing. 

Herbert Lubin and Arthur H. Sawyer purchase Amer¬ 
ican and Canadian rights for “The Warrior” from Harry 
Raver. 

“Today” and “The Mad Lover” are placed on the 
state rights market by Pathe. 

Michigan exhibitors at meeting in Detroit form state 
organization to be affiliated with the American Exhibi¬ 
tors Association. 

Exhibitors of Maritime provinces convene at St. 
John, N: B. 

C. F. Zittel is appointed general manager of the In¬ 
ternational Film Service. 

Henry J. Brock, president of Inter-Ocean Film Co., 
killed in auto accident. 

Vitagraph gets temporary injunction restraining Anita 
Stewart from appearing in pictures for Louis B. Mayer. 

Perfection Pictures are announced. 

C. E. Shurtleff is appointed sales manager of Select 
Pictures. 

Motion Picture Directors Association occupies new 
quarters at 234 West 48th St. 

Paralta Plays, Inc. severs its connection with Triangle. 
Alice Brady signs with Select Pictures Corp. 

Pathe secures rights to Russian Art Films. 

October— 

Herbert Brenon purchases Lewis J. Selznick’s interest 
in the Herbert Brenon Film Corp. 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. buys the Paragon studio 
and printing plant in Fort Lee. 

New England exhibitors convene at the Copley Plaza 
in Boston. 

Brenon secures an injunction pendente lite restraining 
the Export and Import Film Co., Inc., Ben Blumenthal 
and Chadwick from using the title “The Tyranny of the 
Romanoffs, with Iliodor.” 

Clarence L. Yearsley becomes advertising and pub¬ 
licity manager for First National Exhibitors Circuit. 

Rules governing amusement tax are explained by 
Treasury and Internal Revenue officials. 

Paramount-Artcraft national advertising campaign 
is launched. 

Paul H. Cromelin elected president of Inter-Ocean 
Film Co. to succeed the late Henry J. Brock. 

Forence La Badie dies of results of injuries sustained 
in automobile accident. 

Julius Steger resigns as president of Triumph and 
Crystal Film companies and is succeeded by Joseph A. 
Golden. 

The Motion Picture Exposition Co. is incorporated at 
Albany. 

New York exhibitors, in mass meeting, decide to pass 
on the admission tax to the public. 


Motion Picture Exhibitors League of New Jersey holds 
annual convention in Newark. 

Exhibitors League of Kansas convenes at Manhattan, 
Kans. 

Oro Pictures Co. is incorporated with H. Grossman as 
president. 

Harry M. Crandall opens the Knickerbocker theatre in 
Washington. 

D. W. Griffith returns from making pictures in France. 

U. S. Exhibitors Booking Corp. capitalized at one 
million with Frank J. Hall as president and William Old- 
know as secretary and treasurer. 

Bessie Love becomes a Pathe star. 

November— 

W. W. Hodkinson formulates plans for the W. W. 
Hodkinson Corporation. 

Sidney Garrett elected president of J. Frank Brock- 
liss, Inc. 

M. H. Hoffman, Inc., closes deal with the Whartons 
to handle “The Eagle’s Eye.” 

Charlie Chaplin files a number of suits against com¬ 
panies and actors to prevent alleged imitations. 

First number of Bernarr McFadden’s Physical Culture 
Screen Magazine is issued. 

John F. Skerrett of Nicholas Power Co., dies. 

Walter W. Irwin resigns from the American Cinema 
Commission. 

Howell Hansel, director, dies. 

Mutual sues New York Motion Picture Corp. and allied 
concerns for $400,000 alleging violation of contract. 

California theatre of San Franci co, Cal., is opened. 

Gebhardt W. Sahner, president of the Motion Picture 
Exhibitors League of Pennsylvania, dies. 

Theodore C. Deitrich resigns as advertising and pub¬ 
licity director of International Film Service and forms 
De Luxe Pictures, Inc. with Doris Kenyon as the star. 

J. Ernest Williamson is awarded verdict of $3,175 
against Universal Company for alleged breach of con¬ 
tract in connection with a picturization of “Twenty 
Thousand Leagues Under The Sea.” 

Organization of State Right Distributors, Inc. is com¬ 
pleted. 

J. S. Woody becomes general manager of Pacific 
Northwest territory for Select. 

Ruth Stonehouse signs contract with Overland Film 
Co. to produce six features a year. 

December— 

Charlie Chaplin secures an injunction against the Film 
Exchange Inc., the King Komedy Film Co., Inc., Eman¬ 
uel S. Manheimer. Fred Beck, Louis Weiss, George 
Merrick and Samuel Berliner, restraining the defendants 
from producing, releasing or exhibiting spurious Chaplin 
comedies. 

Eleven producing companies charge Brooklyn exhibi¬ 
tors with attempt to boycott Fox and Vitagraph pictures 
on account of fifteen cents a reel tax. United States 
District Attorney is asked to investigate complaint. 

Arrangements are made for the distribution of 
W. W. Hodkinson pictures through General Film 
exchanges. 

American Exhibitors Association opens headquarters 
in Indianapolis. 

Essanay announces discontinuance of program re¬ 
leases and concentration on specials. 


6aumont 

Throughout the entire world this 
name symbolizes the best in motion 
pictures. 

Particularly is this true of the 
Gaumont News Service. 

Invaluable foreign connections, 
a great film library, alert camera¬ 
men and a trained and capable 
editorial staff keep up the Gau¬ 
mont standard. 


The World’s Greatest Pictorial News Service 

Distributed in the United States Through the Best Independent Exchanges 


irk® 

^ TUESDAY 

THE NEWS-REELS OF REAL NWES 

ALWAYS FIRST ON THE SCREEN 

vj; 

“ Gi 

lamont 

raphic 



Gaamont Co. 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

Branches and wide-awake correspondents in all countries 


<0Qn)or)b 

A "x ^ i 



LONDON 

























































The Committee on Public Information approves Fox’s 
the “The Rose of Blood’’ despite Funkhouser’s refusal 
to permit its showing in Chicago. 

Jesse J. Goldburg opens state rights sales bureau. 

Ivan Abramson launches the Graphic Film Company. 

John G. Adolfl resigns as director for Fox. 

Members of the M. P. E. L. of A. and A. E. A. hold 
joint convention in Washington. 

Paramount-Artcraft forms organization in Havana for 
distribution in West Indies and Central America. 

First National Exhibitors Co. of Ohio is incorporated. 

“Spirit of ’76,” issued by the Continental Producing 
Co., is seized by Federal officers in Los Angeles as enemy 
propaganda. Robert Goldstein, producer of the picture, 
is indicted on three counts. 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. places Fred Stone under 
contract. 

Fred E. Wright, after an absence of three years, re¬ 
turns to the direction of Pathe films. 

Eric Campbell, comedian with Charlie Chaplin, killed 
in automobile accident. 

Rivoli theatre. New York, is opened. 

William Fox takes over the Victor studio, 638 West 
43rd St., New York. 

William D. Taylor signs with Famous Players-Lasky. 

Epoch Producing Corp. releases “The Birth of a Na¬ 
tion” to regular motion picture theatres. 

Hiram Abrams and B. P. Sehulberg, respectively 
president and general manager of Paramount Pictures 
Corp., resign their executive offices in order to devote 
themselves to bringing about a closer relationship with 
exhibitors. 

Edgar Lewis sells “The Sign Invisible” to the First 
National Exhibitors Circuit. 

January, 1918— 

Charles W. Gates elected president of Associated 
Theatres, Inc., at first annual meeting in Minneapolis. 

Metro plans enlargement of west coast studio. 

Regal Films, Ltd., Toronto, acquires selling rights in 
Dominion to all films controlled by Globe Films Ltd., 
Toronto. 

Felix Malitz arrested and placed under $5,000 bail, 
charged with having smuggled rubber into Germany 
in 1916. 

Paramount-Artcraft exchange managers convene in 
New York. 

Walter E. Greene becomes head of Paramount, A1 
Lichtman, general manager. 

Censorship fight grows active in Los Angeles. 

James Kirkwood engaged to direct Frank A. Keeney 
productions. 

Mastercraft Photoplay Corp. announced with F. Eugene 
Farnsworth as president and director general. 

Maryland Exhibitors League starts campaign to secure 
repeal of censorship law. 

John Manheimer elected president of Manhattan Ex¬ 
hibitors Local No. 1. 

Semi-annual convention of North Carolina Exhibitors 
Association held in Raleigh. 

Mutual Film Corp. announces the Screen Telegram. 

John Emerson and Anita Loos engaged by Jesse L 
Lasky to work on Paramount pictures. 

Delegation of picture men visits President Wilson at 
the White House. 

Aubrey M. Kennedy resigns as manager of produc¬ 
tion for Goldwyn. 

Motion Picture Directors Association gives dinner and 
dance at the Biltmore. 

John C. Graham closes contract with Gaumont to dis¬ 
tribute Paramount-Artcraft pictures in France and her 
colonies, also Switzerland, Belgium, and Egypt. 


Famous Players-Lasky Corp. absorbs Paramount and 
Artcraft. 

Metro launches Screen Classics, Inc. 

George Loane Tucker becomes managing director for 
Goldwyn pictures. 

February— 

Censorship is threatened in Virginia. 

Wm. A. Brady resigns from World Film Corp. 

Leander Richardson dies of pneumonia. 

Joseph Kaufman dies of pneumonia. 

Famous-Players Lasky Corp. starts administrative 
bureau conducted by Hiram Abrams and B. P. Sehulberg. 

George D. Baker appointed manager of productions 
at Metro’s west coast studio. 

“Smiling Bill” Parsons starts making Capital Com¬ 
edies for Goldwyn. 

Louis B. Mayer again assumes control of American 
Feature Film Co. and Metro Pictures Corp. of New 
England. 

Grauman’s theatre is opened in Los Angeles. 

C. D. Cooley re-elected president at convention of 
Florida Exhibitors League. 

William Russell Productions, Inc. formed. 

Testimonial dinner is given to William Fox at the 
Astor. 

Edwin Thanhouser retires as president of Thanhouser 
Film Corp. 

Sixth annual convention of Oklahoma Exhibitors 
League held in Oklahoma City. 

Birth of a Race Photoplay Corp. is investigated by 
Attorney General Brundage of Illinois. 

Oscar C. Apfel joins World Film to direct Kitty 
Gordon. 

Mutual is denied injunction restraining New York Mo¬ 
tion Picture, Keystone Film Co., Domino Motion Picture 
Corp., and Broncho Motion Picture Co. from re-issuing 
through other companies than Mutual. 

March— 

Mutual adds five new members to its Board of Direc¬ 
tors. 

Fight for Sunday opening in Alabama is started. 

Margaret Mayo resigns as head of Goldwyn scenario 
department. 

William L. Sherrill elected president of Producers and 
Exhibitors Affiliated. 

Haworth Pictures Corp. organized to exploit Sessue 
Hayakawa pictures. 

Goldwyn closes deal with John Olsen and Co. of 
Scandinavia, for releasing Goldwyn pictures in Sweden, 
Norway and Denmark. 

Grand Theatre, Pittsburgh, Harry Davis, owner, is 
opened. 

New York State Exhibitors League convention at the 
Astor, New York. 

Allied Motion Picture Committee starts campaign for 
Sunday opening in New York. 

Stanley V. Mastbaum dies. 

J. A. Berst resigns as vice president and general 
manager of Pathe Exchange, Inc., and Paul Brunet Is 
named as his successor. 

Capital Film Co. incorporated in Indiana with capital 
stock of $2,500,000. 

Julius Steger becomes producing director of Inter¬ 
national Film Service, Inc. 

Crawford Livingston elected president of Thanhouser 
Film Corp. 

U. S. Court of Appeals decides against Funkhouser in 
fight over showing of Fox’s “The Spy” in Chicago. 

Gaumont Company adopts state rights plan of release. 

Mitchell H. Mark, president of Strand Theatre Com¬ 
pany, dies in Buffalo. 


Men You Are Doing Business With 




On these pages appear the 
pictures of men who direct 
the wheels within wheels 
which go to make up that com¬ 
plex commercial institution, 
the Motion Picture Industry 


Joseph W. Engel 

Treas. Metro Pictures Corp. 


John D. Williams 

Mgr. 1st Nat’l Exhibitors Cir. 



Frank A. Keeney 

Frank A. Keeney Corp. 


William A. Brady 

W. A. Brady Productions 


Adolph Zukor Mack Sennett 

Pres. Famous Players-Lasky Mack Sennett Comedies 

Corporation 



Samuel Goldfish 

Pres. Goldwyn Pictures Corp. 


Thomas H. Ince 

Ince Productions 


Cecil B. de Mille Lewis J. Selznick 

Director General, Famous Pres. Select Pictures Corp. 

Players-Lasky Corp. K 

























Harry O. Schwalbe 

Sec. & Treas. 1st Nat’l Exhibi¬ 
tors Circuit 


J. Stuart Blackton 

J. Stuart Blackton Productions 


Louis B. Mayer 

Mayer Productions 


Hiram Abrams 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 


Walter W. Irwin 

Vice-Pres. & Gen’l Mgr. Vita- 
graph 


Isadore Bernstein 

Vice-Pres. Nat’l Film Corp. 


W. E. Shallenberger 

Pres. Arrow Film Corp. 


Robert Lieber 

Pres. 1st Nat’l Exhibitors Cir. 


Lee A. Ochs 

United Picture Theatres, Inc. 


William Fox 

Pres. Fox Film Corp. 


D. W. Griffith 

Griffith Productions 


Jacob Wilk 

Hiller and Wilk 





























P. A. Powers 

Universal Co. 


William N. Selig 

President Selig Polyscope Co. 


Paul Brunet 

Vice-Pres. & Gen’l Mgr. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc. 


William L. Sherry 

President Sherry Service 








George K. Spoor 

President Essanay Co. 


Carl Laemmle 

President Universal Co. 


W. W. Hodkinson 

Pres. W. W. Hodkinson Corp. 


B. A. Rolfe 

B. A. Rolfe Productions 


































James M. Sheldon 

Pres. Mutual Film Corp. 



Walter E. Greene 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 


Charles C. Pettijohn 

Affiliated Distributors Corp. 



William L. Sherrill 

Frohman Amusement Corp. 



R. H. Cochrane 

Vice-Pres. Universal Co. 



Frederick L. Collins 

McClure Pictures Corp. 



Richard A. Rowland 

Pres. Metro Pictures Corp. 


L. L. Hiller 

Hiller & Wilk 


J. L. Kempner 

Inter-Ocean Film Corp. 





Thomas L. Tally 

V-Pres. Nat’l Exhibitors 
Circuit 



Albert E. Smith 

Pres. Vitagraph Co. 



Jesse L. Lasky 

V-Pres. Famous Players-Lasky 
Corp. 

41 








































Milton Sills 


Goldwyn 

Pictures 



MAY ALLISON 


Metro Star 

















April— 

Motion Picture Option Bill is killed in concluding 
session of the 1918 New York legislature. 

D. W. Griffith’.s “Hearts of tlie World” opens. 

H. M. and E. D. Horkheimer turn over Balboa studios 
to Los Angeles Wholesalers Board of Trade for liquida¬ 
tion. 

Convention of Texas exhibitors at Dallas. 

Lee A. Ochs resigns as president of Exhibitors Trade 
Review. 

Society of Motion Picture Engineers holds semi-annual 
meeting in Rochester. 

Stockholders of First National Exhibitors Circuit in 
first annual session. Robert Lieber elected president. 

H. J. (Josh) Binney organizes Florida Film Corp. to 
make two reel comedies. 

Henry McMahon becomes general press representative 
of Educational Film Corp. 

Joshiah Pearce, a leading southern exhibitor, dies. 

Thomas A. Edison, Inc., sells the Edison studio, New 
York, to the Lincoln and Parker Film Co., Worcester, 
Mass. 

Robert Goldstein, producer of “The Spirit of ’76” 
found guilty of violating the espionage act. 

Wm. L. Sherry resigns as head of Paramount’s pur¬ 
chasing department. 

May— 

First issue of Wid’s Daily May 8th. 

John R. Freuler resigns as president of Mutual Film 
Corp. and is succeeded by James L. Sheldon. 

Major Funkhouser again arouses protest by cutting 
scenes from “Hearts of the World” and “My Four Years 
in Germany.” 

Mary Maurice, famous “screen mother,” dies. 

Affiliated Distributors Corp. with capital of $100,000 
incorporated under the laws of Delaware. 

“Pershing’s Crusaders” is shown. 

John E. deWolf, Herman Katz and their associates 
purchase Paralta Pictures Corp. 

Motion Picture Exhibitors Corp. of the Northwest in 
Seventh annual convention at Minneapolis. 

Felix Malitz and Gustave Engler, president and secre¬ 
tary, respectively of American Correspondence Film Co., 
sentenced to prison. 

P. A. Powers heads concern which takes over Fire 
Proof Film Co. plant in Rochester, N. Y., to produce raw 
stock. 

Wm. L. Sherry service to distribute Frank A. Keeney 
pictures. 

Ricord Gradwell elected vice president and general 
manager of World Pictures. 

Russell Bassett, veteran actor, dies. 

William P. S. Earle becomes World Pictures director. 

Fire does $100,000 damage to Lasky plant in Holly¬ 
wood. 

Tom Moore made a Goldwyn star. 

Pauline Frederick forms own company to release 
through Goldwyn. Willard Mack, director. 

Goldwyn announces doubling of output for coming 
year. 

State convention of Illinois Exhibitors League in 
Chicago. 

Sessue Hayakawa pictures, produced by Haworth Pic¬ 
tures Corp., to be released through Mutual. 

John Barrymore returns to Paramount pictures. 

Vitagraph secures services of director James Young. 

J. A. Berst appointed manager of distribution for Di¬ 
vision of Films, Committee on Public Information. 

S. Rankin Drew killed in action in France. 

Major M. L. C. Funkhouser, Chicago censor, suspended. 

Goldwyn engages Reginald Barker and Charles Giblyn. 


June— 

Jesse L. Lasky decides on policy of “cheerful pic¬ 
tures.” 

Marion Davies pictures to be released by Select. 

Federal Trade Commission alleges unfair methods on 
part of Stanley Booking Corp. of Philadelphia. 

Dr. O. I. Lamburger resigns vice presidency of Ivan 
Film Productions, Inc. 

Sol L. Lesser pays $200,000 for “Hearts of the World” 
rights for eleven western states. 

Frank Marion, representative of Committee on Public 
Information, returns from Spain. 

Film Exporters of America form association. 

Benjamin Chapin, Lincoln impersonator, dies. 

M. H. Hoffman retires from Foursquare Pictures, Inc., 
selling holdings to George Backer. 

Fox exchange managers have fourth convention in 
New York. 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. announces a new star in 
“Cuddles,” renamed Lila Lee. 

H. O. Davis leaves Triangle and H. E. Aitken assumes 
active charge of the company. 

Doris Kdnyon, De Luxe Pictures, to go through Wm. 
L. Sherry Service. 

Select eastern branch managers meet in New York. 

Arrow Film Corp. handles “The Finger of Justice.” 

Committee on Public Information prevents showing 
of Universal’s “The Yanks Are Coming” at the Broad¬ 
way theatre. 

Film men present arguments against the raising of 
the tax before Ways and Means Committee in Wash¬ 
ington. 

National Association of Motion Picture Industry with¬ 
draws from Boston Exposition. 

Directors of Affiliated Distributors Corp. in three days’ 
session. 

Trial of Major Funkhouser starts in Chicago. 

Gail Kane forms own company. Pictures to be re¬ 
leased through Mutual. 

Committee on Public Information sends H. C. Hoag- 
land and Lucien C. Wheeler and C. F. Van Arsdale 
abroad to establish distribution system for official films. 

Sol J. Berman, manager of Jewel’s New York ex¬ 
change, dies. 

Judge O’Donnell elected president of Pennsylvania 
Exhibitors League at annual convention. 

July— 

Walter E. Stradlin, cameraman, dies. 

Hampton Del Ruth leaves Mack Sennett forces. 

Director Wm. D. Taylor enters British Officers’ Train¬ 
ing Camp. 

Frank A. Keeney Corp. claims Jewel Carmen despite 
Fox contract. 

Exporters notified that film must be shipped to Trade 
Board representatives. 

American Film Co. announces distribution through 
Patlie exchanges with special representative in each. 

“America’s Answer,” second official war film, opens 
in New Y r ork. 

Colonel Jacob Ruppert announces details of Film 
Clearing House, Inc. 

Peter J. Schaefer elected president at the M. P. E. L. 
of A. convention in Boston. 

Louis B. Mayer and Nathan Gordon form partnership. 

Arthur S. Kirkpatrick made assistant general manager 
of Mutual. 

First National Exhibitors Circuit directors hold three 
days’ session. 

Enrico Caruso starts on first Artcraft production. 

Louis B. Mayer places Anita Stewart under contract. 




i 

3 

i 

• 

Wives of Mer 

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T [ 

MiiMiii r 

A Florence Reed super feature, one < 
the real hits of the year. Wid liked 

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Pioneer Film Corporation 

I 126 West 46th Street New York 1 


... 



L eOCwrtl 


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'FTffdCT'C’k £mlmgbxrr)l 


PAREX FILM CORPORATION FURNISHING 

w l m sherry service 


Executive Office — 729 Seventh 

Exchanges in Following 


NEW YORK 
729 Seventh Ave. 
BOSTON 
16 Piedmont Street 
PHILADELPHIA 
1314 Vine Street 
CHICAGO 
220 State Street 
MINNEAPOLIS 
14 N. Fourth Street 


PITTSBURGH 
804 Penn Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 
180 Golden GateAve. 
ATLANTA 
61 Walton Street 
SEATTLE 

2022 Third Avenue 
LOS ANGEI.ES 
511 West Eighth St. 


Ave., New York 

Cities 

CLEVELAND 

823 Prospect Avenue 
DETROIT 
63 Elizabeth Street 
DALLAS 

1905^2 Commerce St. 
DENVER 

1723 Welton Street 
KANSAS CITY 
921 Walnut Street 


Distributing The Greatest Program in Motion Pictures Today 


FRANK A. KEENEY PRODUCTIONS 

FEATURING 

CATHERINE CALVERT 

Eight appearances every year in master pictures by noted 
authors 

GOLDEN WEST PRODUCING CO. 

PRESENTING 

G. M. ANDERSON 

Famous Creator of “BRONCHO BILLY” in EIGHT BIG. NEW 
Productions a Year 

THE BUR LINGH AM 

Series of 30 subjects for the Ensuing Year 


DE LUXE PICTURES 

PRESENTING 

DORIS KENYON 

The Exquisite Empress of Expression in Eight Prodnctions 
Every Year 

HAROLD J. BINNEY 

PRESENTING 

VANGIE VALENTINE 

The Most Lovable Creature Ever Seen on the Screen—In Eight 
Productions Yearly 

TRAVEL PICTURES 

Booked Solid at Strand Theatre, N. Y. C. 


52 BIG PRODUCTIONS A YEAR — OTHER STARS TO BE ADDED 


















J. Stuart Blackton produces “Tlie Common Cause” in 
co-operation with the British-Canadian Recruiting 
Mission. 

Vitagraph signs Bessie Love as a star. 

William Parke made director general of Education 
Film Corp. 

August— 

Court decides that Sunday shows are illegal in Phila¬ 
delphia. 

Major Funkhouser, formally dismissed as Chicago 
censor. 

Anita Stewart productions to be distributed through 
First National Exhibitors Circuit. 

Metro holds third annual convention at New York 
offices. 

Fox announces new brand for coming year. 

N. A. M. P. I. recommends changes in export regula¬ 
tions. 

Tax on theatres, according to seating capacity, to be 
doubled. 

Robert W. Priest organizes the Film Market, Inc. 

Rolfe Productions Inc. starts Houdini serial. 

Frank G. Hall launches Producers Distributing Corp. 
with $10, $20, $30 rentals. 

American Exhibitors Association convention in Chi¬ 
cago promises to draw big attendance. 

J. A. Berst resigns as manager of distribution for the 
Division of Films and Dennis J. Sullivan is appointed to 
succeed him. 

Sol Lesser opens ‘‘Hearts of the World” office in 
Chicago. 

Evelyn Nesbit becomes Fox star. 

United Picture Theatres, Inc., announces Dustin 
Farnum, Kitty Gordon and Florence Reed as first three 
stars. 

Affiliated Distributing Corp. selects Leonce Perret’s 
“Lafayette. We Come!” for an initial attraction. 

W. C. Thompson is arrested and charged with being 
a receiver of stolen goods. Round-up of film thieves 
starts. 

Motion Picture industry declared essential by Prior¬ 
ities Committee of the War Industries Board. 




MABEL BALLIN 

has played special engagements with 

VITAGRAPH 
FAMOUS PLAYERS 
TRIANGLE 
GOLDWYN 
WORLD 


Permanent address may 
be obtained from the 
office of Wid’s Daily 



























a JUNE ELVIDGE § 

IllllllllllllimillllllllllllllllllllllllfllililllllllllllllllllllllllllllW^ 


iPiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 

Re /easea 

= ■miMiiiiuiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiMimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiMimmiiii 

= iiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiiiiiHiumiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiMimiiitiuiMiiiKiiiHii 

| ‘‘The Power 

and 

| The Glory” 

| “The Cabaret” 

| “The Oldest 

Law” 


“Appearance 
of Evil” | 

“The Bluffer” | 

1 


Personal Management EDWARD SMALL, 1493 Broadway, N. Y. 


In Preparation 


Hugh Thompson 

Leads 


A Year of Achievement, Working Continually 
Current Releases 


“Queen X” . . 

“Queen of the Sea” . 

“A Daughter of France ” 

“Forbidden Path ”. 

“Soul of Buddha” . 

“Street of Seven Stars ”. 

“House of Gold” . 

“Ashes of Love” . 

“Secret Strings” . 


. .. .with Edna Goodrich 
with Annette Kellerman 
. .with Virginia Pearson 

.with Theda Bara 

.with Theda Bara 

.with Doris Kenyon 

.with Emmy Wehlen 

.with Graphic 

.with Olive Tell 


Especially engaged to be featured in 

“WHEN THE GIANT WAKES’ 

(now in preparation ) 























Film Exports 


and Imports 


for Twelve Months 


IMPORTS OF FILMS 

—X9i7=i9i8 


JULY, 1917 — 

Quantity 

Value 

Sensitized but not exposed. .. 

5,139,194 

$72,493 

Negatives . 

61,065 

21,772 

Positives . 

182,837 

11,261 

AUGUST 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

5,528,152 

82,099 

Negatives. 

20,169 

5,085 

Positives . 

40,477 

1,890 

SEPTEMBER 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

4,331,704 

64.229 

Negatives . 

146,439 

12,600 

Positives . 

777,764 

28,559 

OCTOBER 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

6,073.516 

92,397 

Negatives . 

139,636 

48,193 

Positives . 

509,017 

23,964 

NOVEMBER 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

11,797,560 

174,773 

Negatives . 

• 83,976 

19,603 

Posith r es . 

460,470 

16,897 

DECEMBER 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

2,614,378 

43.743 

Negatives . 

26,172 

3,915 

Positives . 

251,016 

16,573 

JANUARY, 1918 — 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

1,333,972 

22,023 

Negatives . 

38,552 

9,709 

Positives . 

283,612 

21,212 

FEBRUARY 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

1,938,693 

35,005 

Negatives . 

85,499 

30,521 

Positives . 

159,752 

7,906 

MARCH 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

2,734,164 

51,786 

Negatives . 

18,206 

4,235 

Positives . 

96,327 

5,171 

APRIL 



Sensitized but not exposed. .. . 

2,151.070 

36,692 

Negatives . 

15,377 

1,943 

Positives . 

113,130 

8,750 

MAY 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

3,788,892 

62,861 

Negatives . 

35,475 

4,443 

Positives . 

160,044 

15,075 

JUNE 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

31,420 

1,034 

Negatives . 

42,797 

4,014 

Positives . 

340,051 

19,890 

TOTAL, 1917=1918 — 



Sensitized but not exposed. . . . 

47,462,715 

$739,135 

Negatives. 

713,363 

166,033 

Positives . 

3,374,497 

177,148 


EXPORTS OF FILMS EXPOSED— 1917=1918 


1917 

Quantity 

Value 

July. 

. 2,738,523 

$333,397 

August . 

. 5,547,171 

355,305 

September . 

. 5,383,410 

429.978 

October . 

. 4.975,482 

364.751 

November. 

. 8,891,654 

577,522 

December. 

. 9,852,702 

579,464 

1918 

January . 

.10,309,894 

672,457 

February . 

. 6,577,069 

338,020 

March . 

. 8,165,608 

426,422 

April. 

. 5,795,556 

297,011 


May .11,313,300 487,087 

June . 4,996,207 271,034 


Totals.84,546,576 $5,132,448 

EXPORTS OF FILMS, UNEXPOSED— 1917=1918 

1 9 1 7 Quantity Value 

July . 6,705,734 $142,640 

August . 3,635,712 91,447 

September . 2,461,881 59,985 

° ctol >er. 3,449,829 73,875 

November. 2,044,351 47,634 

December. 1,210,402 40,730 

1918 

Janua LV . 1,097,989 34,203 

February . 1,024,444 30,518 

March .14,257,451 396,559 

£P nl . 1,576,939 50,596 

May .17,542,378 345,437 

June . 2,987,954 71,667 


Totals .57,995,064 $1,385,291 

EXPORTS BY YEARS—EXPOSED FILMS 


1913-1914— 




Quantity 

Value 

Sensitized 

but 

not 

exposed 

44,717,323 

$889,560 

Negatives 




20,057,144 

1,009,469 

Positives . 





402,704 

1 

1914-1915— 





Sensitized 

but 

not 

exposed 

61,402,312 

967,907 

Negatives 




10,789,439 

411,999 

Positives 





258,800 

1915-1916— 





Sensitized 

but 

not exposed 

58,490,788 

750,023 

Negatives 




764,105 

225,690 

Positives . 




6,742,988 

256,332 

1916-1917— 






Sensitized 

but 

not 

exposed 

52,294.075 

802,324 

Negatives 




950,152 

448,252 

Positives 




3,802,960 

227.118 

1917-1918— 






Sensitized 

but 

not 

exposed 

47,462,715 

739,135 

Negatives 




713,363 

166,033 

Positives . 




3,374,497 

177,148 


EXPORTS BY 

YEARS 






Quantity 

Value 


1913- 1914 . 32,690,104 $2,282,924 

1914- 1915 . 35.987,460 2,498,504 

1915- 1916 . 158,751,786 6,757,658 

1916- 1917 . 128,549.816 6,633.291 

1917- 1918 . 84,557,376 5,132,528 


EXPORTS BY YEARS—UNEXPOSED FILMS 


Quantity Value 

1913- 1914 . 155.359,550 $4,264,722 

1914- 1915 . 115,067,424 2,591,444 

1915- 1916 . 72.298,993 2,220.118 

1916- 1917 . 49,486,415 1,125,895 

1917- 1918 . 57,995,064 1,385,291 


TOTAL OF ALL EXPORTS BY YEARS 


Quantity Value 

1913- 1914 . 188,049,654 $6,547,646 

1914- 1915 . 151,054,884 5,089,948 

1915- 1916 . 231,050,779 8,977,776 

1916- 1917 . 178,036,231 7,759,186 

1917- 1918 . 142,552,440 6,517,819 





















































































We Bought 

u The Hearts of the World r 

for the entire South and Central America 

Gillespie Bros. & Co. 

Exporters, Importers, Merchants and Bankers 

from 

1837 

LONDON NEW YORK 

The House of Confidence 

BUYING 4 SHIPPING 

MOVING PICTURE FILMS 

for 

FOREIGN COUNTRIES 


Film Department 
220 WEST 42nd STREET 

NEW YORK 












A Little Talk with 

American 

Producers 



It is one thing to make a picture. 

It is another to get the maximum earning power out of it. 

The home market is just one form of yield. 

The foreign market is equally important. 

Properly exploited, it brings large net returns. 

The Inter-Ocean is in a unique position to secure such returns 
for producers on subjects that haven’t been hawked about. 

We have a simple requirement: a first look at subjects whose 
makers are sure they are standard. 

It will pay such producers not to sign away foreign rights before 
consultation with us. And there is a possibility that we might like 
to take over world rights on a few good features during the 1918-’19 
American amusement season. 



INTERS OCEAN FIL/Ai 


mcorpBra' 


INTER-OCEAN 

I3ljlt-DING 




218 W. 42™ ST. 
NEW YORK CITY 


PAUL H.CROMELIN 

PRES. SEN'L.MOR. 


“We Operate Everywhere”—Largest Distributors of Films in Foreign Fields 

and Sole Exporters of Speer Carbons, Fulco Accessories and Globe Reels. 

# 















ttpfcior 

Pit-fcur 

Class* 




attraction 


Photographed 
at the risk of life 


Nagapate. 

i||ff handsomestar 
S cruelest look) 
sa.va.ge we 
have ever- 
seen." 




V ?* 6 


Distribution ri dhts th 
the world controlled 


1600 Broadw< 


New York Ci 














States Right Percentage Estimates 


FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS’ CIRCUIT 

Percentage 


Southern California and Arizona. 2 y 2 

Northern California and Nevada . 3% 

Washington, Ore., Montana and N. Idaho. 5 

Utah, Colo., Wyo., New Mexico and So. Idaho. . 2% 

Canada (West of Fort Williams). 1% 

Illinois. 7*4 

Indiana . 3 *4 

Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. 5% 

Michigan . 4 

Minn., Wis., No. and So. Dakota. 5*4 

Missouri . 3 % 

Ohio. 6 % 

New England States . 7*4 

Maryland, Dist. of Columbia and Delaware.... 2% 

New Jersey... 3 % 

Greater New York . 8% 

New York State. 4 

Eastern Pennsylvania .. 4% 

Western Pennsylvania and W. Virginia. 4 

Canada (Ontario) . 2 % 

Canada (Quebec and East) . 2 

Georgia, Fla., Va. and No. and So. Carolina. 3% 

Louisiana and Miss. 2 

Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. 4 % 

Kentucky and Tennessee . 2 

AFFILIATED DISTRIBUTORS CORP. 

Per Cent. Days 

New England States . 7% 150 

New York State up to and including 
Poughkeepsie, Long Island and Nor¬ 
thern New Jersey to Trenton. 8% 215 

New York State, North and West of 

Poughkeepsie . 3% 110 


Eastern Pennsylvania, including east of 
a line drawn North and South 
through Harrisburg, including same, 
and Southern New Jersey, all south 
of a line drawn through Trenton and 


including same . 

5% 

100 

Western Pennsylvania, all west of a line 
drawn North and South through 
Harrisburg, excluding same and in¬ 
cluding West Virginia. 

4% 

100 

Delaware, District of Columbia, Mary¬ 
land, Virginia, North and South 
Carolina, Alabama, Tennessee, and 
Florida . 

8 

200 

Northern Ohio, all north and including 
a line drawn through Troy, Co¬ 
lumbus and Zanesville . 

4 

100 

Southern Ohio, south of line drawn 
through Troy, Columbus and Zanes¬ 
ville, and the state of Kentucky, east 
of a line running North and South 
with the line between Ohio and 
Indiana . 

3 

100 

State of Michigan . 

4 

100 

Indiana except the four Northwestern 
counties, and including Southern Illi¬ 
nois, except certain counties to be 
agreed upon with Missouri and that 
part of Kentucky west of a line run¬ 
ning North and South with the line 
between Ohio and Indiana. 

3y 8 

100 


State of Illinois, north of and including 
Litchfield and river towns in Iowa 
from Cedar Rapids to Keokuk and 
Southern Wisconsin including La¬ 
crosse, Monroe, Wood, Portage, • 
Waushara, Waupana, Winnibago, 
Calumet, Antigamie, Monitowoc, 


Brown, Kewanee Counties and the 


four Northwestern counties in Indi¬ 
ana, adjacent to Chicago. 8 

Minnesota, North and South Dakota and 
Northern Wisconsin in north of Mil¬ 
waukee . 3 


Iowa and Nebraska, except River Towns 
from Cedar Rapids to Keokuk, in¬ 
clusive . 3 

Missouri, except three Northwestern 
counties, and including certain coun¬ 
ties'in Southern Illinois, to be agreed 

upon with Indiana. 3 

Kansas, including three Northwestern 

counties of Missouri. 3 

Oklahoma and Arkansas. 3 

Louisiana and Mississippi. 3 

Texas .. • • 3 

Montana, Woming, Utah, Colorado. New 
Mexico, Arizona, Idaho, Washington 
Mexico, Arizona, Idaho, Washing¬ 
ton, Oregon, Nevada, California, 

Alaska and Hawaii. 11% 

Balance of 7% % to be added to the cost 
of distribution. 


200 


150 


100 


100 

100 

100 

100 

100 


300 


ERNEST SHIPMAN 


Percentage 


Southern California and Arizona. 

Northern California and Nevada . 

Washington, Ore., Mont, and N. Idaho. 

Utah, Colo., Wyo., N. M. & So. Idaho. 

Canada (West of Fort Williams). 

Illinois. 

Indiana . 

Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. 

Michigan. 

Minn., Wis., N. and South Dakota. 


Missouri . 

Ohio. 

New England States . 

Maryland, Dist. of Col. and Delaware 

New Jersey. 

Greater New York. 


New York State. 

Eastern Pennsylvania . 

Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia 


Canada (Ontario) . 

Canada (Quebec and East) ••••••• 

Georgia, Fla., Virginia and No. and S. 

Louisiana and Mississippi. 

Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas . . . . 
Kentucky and Tennessee. 


Carolina. . 


2 y 2 

3 % 

5 

2 % 

1 % 

7 % 

3 % 

sy 2 

4 

514 

3 y 2 

6 y 4 
7 % 
2 % 
3 % 
814 

4 

4% 

4 

2 % 

2 

3 % 
2 

4% 

2 


STATE RIGHTS DISTRIBUTORS, INC.^^ 


New England, including Maine, New Hampshire, 

Mass., Vermont, Conn., R. I. 

New York State. 

New Jersey. 

Eastern Pennsylvania .. 

Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia. 

(In cases where W. Va. is included in Ohio Ac 

Ky. Sale) . 

Maryland, Delaware and Virginia ••••••••*••• 

North and South Carolina, Georgia, Ala., I la., 

Tenn., Miss. 

Michigan. 

Indiana and Illinois. 

Wis., Mo., Minn., and la. 

Ark., La., Texas and Okla. 

Mont., Ore., Wash., Idaho and Alaska. 

Ariz., Nev. and Cal... 

Utah, Colo., New Mexico and Wyoming. 

Kansas, Nebraska, No. and So. Dakota. 


8 

14 

4 

4% 

4 

7 

3% 

3y 4 

4 
11 

5% 

5 

4 % 

6 

2 % 

5% 

















































































Incorporating 

Wests Pictures 
Spencers Pictures 
International Pictures 
Amalgamated Pictures 
Pathe (Australia) 
Gaumont (Australia) 
Johnson & Gibson 

Australasian Films Limited 

AND 

Union Theatres Limited 

Head Offices — SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 

owning , controlling and supplying 

PICTURE THEATRES 

and 

FILM RENTING ORGANIZATIONS 

throughout 

Australia Fiji Islands Far East 

New Zealand British New Guiana and Java 

{and having exclusive territorial rights) to 

Triangle Select World 

Vitagraph First National Exhib. Circuit Pathe 
and Charlie Chaplin Productions 

Sole Australasian licensees for Simplex 
projectors and other M. P. accessories 

Always in the market tor the best films 


Australasian Films Limited 

American Representative 

Millard Johnson 

Room 601, 602 Godfrey Building 
Tel. 7824 Bryant 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York City 


Alphabetical List of 
Features Separately 
Indexed Under Star 
and Director Headings 


From September ist, 1917 to September 1st, 1918 


When preparations were begun on this first 
issue of “Wid’s Year Book,” an effort was made 
to secure as much informative data as possible, 
particularly things which had never before been 
presented in any sort of tabulated form. 

There has never, up to the present time, been 
compiled a list of the features made by all com¬ 
panies, nor has any record been prepared listing 
these features under the headings of directors 
and stars. This we have tried to do. 

In attempting to secure this information, we 
found tremendous difficulty in checking up to 
get our lists accurate. 

There have undoubtedly been quite a number 
of omissions, but as nearly as it is humanly pos¬ 
sible, we have tried to verify all of the informa¬ 
tion herein presented. 

The influenza epidemic and a printers’ strike 
has caused considerable additional trouble in pre¬ 
paring these schedules, and getting them off the 
press, so that we can say very frankly that while 
we think this schedule will be of tremendous 
value during the coming year, we realize that it 
is not as complete a schedule as will be in the 
next Year Book. 

I 11 the first listing, all features will be found in 
alphabetical order with the releasing company, 
the date of release, the star, director, and date 
of the review, if a review of the film appeared in 
“Wid’s.” This index should be of tremendous 
value to the entire trade in quickly checking up 
any subject. 

In the following two listings will be found the 
productions of various directors and the produc¬ 
tions of various stars, with these personages ar¬ 
ranged in alphabetical order. 

It is unfortunate that the delay caused by the 
epidemic and the strike brings this book out some 
time after the time originally intended, but the 
next issue of the Year Book will carry a com¬ 
plete table from September 1st, 1918 to Septem¬ 
ber 1st, 1919, so that these issues will be in¬ 
valuable for reference purposes. 









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James Vincent 


M. P. D. A. 


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Success to 4 4 JVid ’ ’ 


George H. 

Melford 

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Famous Players-Lasky Co. 


Lawrence C. Windom 

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HAROLD PERCIVAL 

Art Director 

THOS. H. INCE PRODUCTIONS 


DOROTHY DALTON 

In 

VIVE LA FRANCE 


SETTINGS FOR 


HENRY WALTHAL 

In 

FALSE FACES 


CHAS. RAY and ENID BENNETT 


in New Productions 


11 flttlTHin 1 till Illllttl IlflIIIBffMI IMIlllMlltllll II1 ... 

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Mrs. Slacker 

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A Man's World 

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Our Little Wife 


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Victor Schertzinger 

FEATURE DIRECTOR 

Thos. H. Ince Studios * 


“The Clodhopper” 

“The Hired Man” 
“Sudden Jim” 

“The Claws of the Hun 
“ The Son of his Father ’ 














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MONROE SALISBURY 

Recent Release 

That Devil Bateese 


JAMES YOUNG 

After reviewing “Oliver Twist,” Wid said: “Jimmie Young need never 
make another film to be assured of a place among the truly big directors.” 

See EARLE WILLIAMS in the“Plea to Buy,” Fourth Liberty Loan 
Picture. Directed by JAMES Young. 

“My Official Wife,” the first big four-reel picture to receive World¬ 
wide recognition. Made by JAMES Young. 

“Goodness Gracious,” the first of the Burlesque Comedies made by TAMES 
Young. 

Have you seen 

SESSUE HAYAKAWA in “The White Man’s Law” and “The Temple 
of Dusk.” 

AIRS. HUMPHREY WARD’S “Missing” 

Remember MAE MURRAY incomparable in “Sweet Kitty Bellairs.” 
Remember “On Trial,” “Hearts in Exile”—all successes—ARTISTIC 
AND FINANCIAL SUCCESSES. 













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CORENE UZZELE 


Leads & Heavies 

in 

“On Trial” 

“Seven Keys to Baldpate” 
“Grain of Dust” 
“Thunderbolts of Fate” 
“Hunting Happiness” 

“The Iron Heart” 

“The Woman of Impulse” 
“Conquered Hearts” 

“The Hunting of 
the Hawk” 

“The Dare-Devil” 

Address all communications care of 

Kirmmse , 51 Jf r . 37th St., New York 

Phone , Greeley 2668 


Edwin Carewe 

M. P. D. A. 


METRO PICTURES CORPORATION 














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Premier Screen Debut of David Belasco’s Star 

BLANCHE BATES 

Supported by 

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in 


Zane Grey’s Famous Novel 

“THE BORDER LEGION 

Personally directed by 

T. HAYES HUNTER 




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GO-STARS IN 

The 

Silent 

Mystery 


A Francis Ford Serial 

FRANCIS FORD 


MAE. GASTON 


COMING and by EMPEY 


Tales From a Dugout 

By ARTHUR GUY EMPEY 

AUTHOR OF 

“ OVER THE TOP/’ “FIRST CALL,” etc. 


































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JVilliam Christy Cahanne 


PAUL POWELL 

Feature Director 















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Willis & Ingtts 

of Los Angeles 


W H EN you say this, you about cover everything per¬ 
taining to the Industry on the Pacific Coast, whether 


it be Engagements of Directors or Stars, Management, 
Publicity, or Advice on Money-making Features. 


We rejer to any person op responsibility in the Film Business 


Offices: Wright Callender Building, Custom Studios, Hollywood 


CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 

Agency 

1482 BROADWAY — Telephone, Bryant 9130 


Exclusive Manager and Agent for 


Frank Mayo 
Arthur Ashley 
Mabel Withee 
Katharine Kaelred 
Fritzi Sgheff 
Grace La Rue 
Blanche Ring 


Harry Fox 
Vera Michelena 
Frances Carson 
Leon Gordon 
Clara Joel 
Josephine Victor 
Regine Wallace 
Earle Foxe 


Marie Carroll 
Florence Mills 
George Kinnear 
Julia Kelety 
Ruth Shepley 
Edith Taliaferro 
Thomas W. Ross 


Mr. Brown has cast for the Famous Players, Norma Talmadge, 
World Film, Goldwyn, Maurice Tourneur, Clara Kimball Young, 
Vitagraph and has special service for small part actors and quick 
action for leading players. 


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ANTONIO 

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Vitagraph Star 


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The Screen's Most 
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1493 Broadway, New York 

















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CHARLES 

SWICKARD 

Feature Director 


PRODUCER OF 

The Light of 
Western Stars 

Featuring DUSTIN FARNUM 

Now Directing BERT LYTELL 

in Metro Features 


.iHiiiiMiiiiiiiiitiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiMMMniMiiimiiimiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiimiit: 
= iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij. = 

|| Charles Miller || 

M. P. D. A. 

Director of 

II “The Flame of the Yukon” |[ 
“Ghosts of Yesterday” 
if “The Service Star” !i 


Now Directing 

= = 

I) “Wilson or the Kaiser” 

c E 

A Screen Classic for Metro 


EDWARD SMALL 

Personal Representative 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

= raiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii'r = 

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This mark was created to express the 
class distinction of 

RIALTO DE LUXE PRODUCTIONS 

Wherever it appears it can be taken as 
an absolute guarantee of not only a fine 
production of true box office quality and 
artistic excellence, but an unusual achieve¬ 
ment as well. 

The first RIALTO DE LUXE PRO¬ 
DUCTION which met with such over¬ 
whelming and gratifying reception was 

Grace Valentine 
in 

“THE UNCHASTENED WOMAN” 


This popular star will also appear in 
Oliver Morosco’s greatest hit, 

“UPSTAIRS AND DOWN” 

This scintillating Broadway success will 
be released shortly. 

Another RIALTO DE LUXE PRO¬ 
DUCTION— 

Marguerite Marsh in 
“CONQUERED HEARTS” 


Rialto de Luxe Productions 

130 West 46th Street, N. Y. 


GEORGE KLEINE SYSTEM 
DISTRIBUTORS 


Jack Cunningham 

STAFF WRITER AT THE 

Robert Brunton Studios 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 


Recent and Coming Releases : 

Bessie Barriscale 
in 

“THE HEART OF RACHAEL” 

and 

“TWO GUN BETTY” 


Frank Keenan 
in 

“THE SILVER GIRL” 
and 

“TODD OF THE TIMES” 


Louise Glaum 
in 

“A LAW UNTO HERSELF” 
and 

“TLIE WHITE SQUAW” 


J. Warren Kerrigan 
in 

“A BURGLAR FOR A NIGHT” 












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EDWARD WARREN 

PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 


SOULS REDEEMED 

SIX REELS, FEATURING 

Marie Shotwell Charlotte Ives 

Sheldon Lewis Walter Hampden 


WEAVERS OF LIFE 

SIX REELS, FEATURING 
Helen Hayes Howard Hall 

Edna Hibbard Earl Schenck 


THUNDER=BOLTS OF FATE 

SIX REELS, FEATURING 

House Peters and Anna Lehr 


PERSONALLY DIRECTED BY EDWARD WARREN 


Edward Warren Productions 

1482 BROADWAY, N. Y. C. 


Arvid E. Gillstrom 

announces his engagement 
as Director with' the 

Fox Film Corporation 

First Release 

Jane and Katherine Lee 

in 

“Swat The Spy” 

Written and Directed by 

ARVID E. GILLSTROM 




























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= ......... § 


Bernard McConville 

FOR THREE YEARS SCENARIO WRITER D. W. GRIFFITH STUDIOS 

Author or Collaborator of Stories for 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, DOROTHY and LILLIAN GISH, 

ROBERT HARRON, BESSIE LOVE, CONSTANCE and 
NORMA TALMADGE, MAE MARSH, JEWEL CARMEN, 

TOM MIX, THEDA BARA, MARY MILES MINTER, 

MONROE SALISBURY and other stars. 

Announces 

The Publication of a Series of Original Photoplays in Printed Form 

to be Submitted to the Producers 

Address: L. A. Athletic Club, Los Angeles , Califor?iia 


E ..1 n 11111111111111 i 1111 m 1111111 m> 11 n 1 n 11 n 11111111111 ■ 11111111 n■ 111111111........ = 

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Outing Chester Pictures 

Travel Classics which Add 

Distinction to any Program, 

Produced in co-operation with 

OUTING 


The great outdoor MAGAZINE 
Under Personal Supervision of 

C. L. CHESTER 


120 WEST 41st STREET 


NEW YORK CITY 




















































































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To Wid— 

William C. Dowlan 

Director of Super-Features 

Triangle 


Telephone-Bryant-7590-7591-5423 
Cable Address, Tamsart; New York 
Correspondents in London, Paris and Milan 


ARTHUR W. 

TAMS 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

INC. 


Music 

Circulating 

Library 

The largest and only 
complete Music 
Library in the world. 
Music of every des¬ 
cription on Rental. 
Orchestrations 
for large or small 
Orchestras. 


Costumes 

Theatrical 
and Modern 
for Hire 


Wigs, Make up 
Materials, Make up 
People, Professional 
Coaches (Musical 
and Dramatic). 


1600 BROADWAY 

Between 48th and 49th Streets 
NEW YORK CITY 


SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR 
ARRANGING, TRANSPOSING, 
COPYING AND HARMONIZING 
MUSIC 


Costume Department Specially Adapted 
for Use of Motion Picture Productions 

























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Hugo Ballin 


Goldwyn 


Chet Withey 

Productions 

Sir Herbert Tree 

“Old Folks at Home” 

Bobbie Harron 

“The Bad Boy” 

Mae Marsh and Bobbie Harron 
“The Warf Rat” 

Seena Owen 

“A Woman's Awakening” 

Seena Owen 

“Madame Bo Peep” 

Madge Kennedy 
“Nearly Married” 

Jack Barrymore 
“On the Quiet” 

Billie Burke 

“The Pursuit of Polly” 

Dorothy Gish and George Fawcett 
“THE HUN WITHIN” 


6707 Yucca Street, Hollywood, Calif. 







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Eastern Penn, and So. New Jersey—First National Exhibitors, Phila.—State of New York, ^ 
New England and No. New Jersey—“Topics of the Day” Films, 729 Seventh Ave., N. Y. 


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TOPICS OF THE DAY 

Now Showing in the Leading Theatres Throughout the United States 


SNAPPY — HUMOROUS AND TIMELY PUNCH EDITORIALS 


Compiled by America's Greatest News Weekly 



A. E. SIEGEL, General Manager 

Phone, Bryant 5851 

Topics of the Day Films 
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World’s Qreatest Director 

DELL HENDERSON 


Lloyds Film Storage Corporation 


SAFEST PLACE IN THE WORLD FOR 

VALUABLE 

MOTION PICTURE FILMS 

Vaults 

345 WEST 40th STREET, N. Y. C. 

Office and Projection Rooms 

220 WEST 42nd STREET, N. Y. C. 














Charles Gunn Raymond Hatton 

Framing Framers . 12/30/17 Triangle Ferris Hartman The Whispering Chorus . 3/25/18 Para. C. B. DeMille 


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Theodore C. Deitrich presents 

Doris Kenyon 

Heading her own company 

DeLUXE PICTURES, Inc., in 

EIGHT BIG FEATURES EACH YEAR 

Released through the Wm. L. Sherry Service 

Executive offices, 516 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



“WID” SAYS: 

“Little Joey Jacobs is going 
to make a big hit in this and 
your folks will want to see 
more of him.” 

(Review of “ Boston Blackie's 
Little Pal," Metro , — Sept. 8th) 


The wholesome “kiddie element” that “Wid” describes as “sure-fire audi¬ 
ence stuff” has made many a weak production register as delightful enter¬ 
tainment. 

Kiddie stuff has been deleted from many scripts because most children 
try the patience of the director and cause innumerable losses in time and 
re-takes. 

That’s why we’re telling you about Joey Jacobs—he grasps instructions 
quickly, has cute tricks of his own, is unspoiled—and a Keystone training 
has prepared him for anything that may be required of a part.' 


make a 
memo 
\novr! 




OPEN FOR LIMITED OR PERMANENT ENGAGEMENTS ON THE WEST COAST 

Phone or drop a card to Mrs. S. H. Jacobs, 2225 Effie St., Los Angeles 









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Ruby De Remer 

Current Releases: 

“The Auction Block” “Pals First” 

Coming Release: 

“The Great Romance” 

Specially engaged by J. Stuart Blackton to be 
featured in a special super-production under 
his personal direction. 

Management of 

EDWARD SMALL 

1493 Broadway, New York 

















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Eulalie Jensen 

325 West 45th Street 


Recent Releases 

“ The Strength oj the Weak” 
‘ e Tanghed Lives’’ 



EULALIE JENSEN 



ILugene Strong 

Leads 

CURRENT RELEASES 
“The Border Legion ” with Blanche Bates 
“Her Mistake,” - - with Evelyn Nesbit 

COMING RELEASE 

“Lady E red eric k,” - with Ethel Barrymore 

Now with J. Stuart Blackton Productions 


Personal Management of 


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1493 Broadway 


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June Mathis 

Metro Scenario Writer 
Jluthor of 

“TO HELL WITH THE KAISER” 

announces her arrival at 

Metro’s New Hollywood Studio 


Export and Import Film Go., Inc. 

0 

CONTROLLING 

100 Metro Productions for Europe and South America 
16 Special Mutual Productions for South America 
The Houdini Serial for the Entire World 

Selig Polyscope Productions for the Entire World, excluding 
England 

B. A. Rolfe Productions for the Entire World 
Also Cartoons—Comedies—Special Features. 

ATTENTION MANUFACTURERS! 

Perhaps you are progressive enough to realize that there is some¬ 
thing behind this record. 

Perhaps we can do the same for you. 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York 

Telephone Bryant 4566-7-8 





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M. 

H. HOFFMAN 

SPECIALIZING IN THE SALES 

AND DISTRIBUTION OF ; 

WORLD S RIQHTS 

of 

NEGATIVES 

SPEAK TO ME ABOUT THAT SPECIAL! ! 


LOCAL DISTRIBUTION in 

NEW YORK and NEW JERSEY 


Genuinely Efficient 

729 Seventh Avenue New York City 


Williamson Brothers 
The Submarine Film Corporation 

J. E. Williamson, General Manager 
Longacre Building, New York City 

Originators and Sole Producers 
of Submarine Photoplays 


Coming • —A distinguished series of Educational and Scientific 

- Under-Sea Pictures, produced with the aid of 

Government Scientists. Further announcements later. 















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Do You Know What a Picture Is Worth in the 

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AMERICAN AGENTS OF 
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Scanned from the collection of 

The Wisconsin Center for 
Film and Theatre Research 


Coordinated by the 

Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 


Funded by a donation from 
Eileen Bowser